Relive 1989 at popular Astoria restaurant
by Shane Miller
Aug 11, 2009 | 2505 views | 0 0 comments | 36 36 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Councilman Peter Vallone (left) and Assemblyman Michael Gianaris help Domenico (second from right) and Anthony (far right) Sacramone celebrate the 20th anniversary of their restaurant, Sac's Place.
Councilman Peter Vallone (left) and Assemblyman Michael Gianaris help Domenico (second from right) and Anthony (far right) Sacramone celebrate the 20th anniversary of their restaurant, Sac's Place.
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In 1989, Bobby McFerrin's “Don't Worry, Be Happy” was named the record of the year, the first President Bush was sworn into the Oval Office, and the Oakland A's defeated the San Francisco Giants in a World Series interrupted by an earthquake. And that same year, two brothers from Astoria took their mother's Italian recipes and opened up a small restaurant at the intersection of Broadway and 24th Street in their old neighborhood.

In celebration of their 20th anniversary, the brothers behind Sac's Place, Anthony and Domenico Sacramone, are turning back the clock, offering their complete menu and wine list to customers at 1989 prices.

“So come in and have a slice of pizza for $1.25 or a bowl of pasta for $5.99,” Anthony told a crowd of about 50 cheering friends and family during a private reception at the restaurant last week to announce the promotion.

“We're turning back the clock on our prices as our way to say thank you to our loyal customers and neighbors in Astoria,” added Domenico.

The promotion will take place from August 19 to 23. According to Domenico, over the last 20 years prices at Sac's Place have risen by about 30 percent.

The menu at Sac's Place is based on the family recipes of Anthony and Domenico's mother, who still arrives at the restaurant every day at 5 a.m. to prep food.

When the brother decided to open a restaurant, they bought the site of a former candy store that they used to hang out in as kids. Nine years later, Sac's Place was so successful that they bought the shoemaker's shop next door and expanded.

Vinny Mongelli grew up with the Sacramone brothers in Astoria and hung out in the same candy shop. He had no doubt that the restaurant would be successful when it opened two decades ago.

“Anthony has always been a good cook, but of course he has gotten a lot better,” said Mongelli at last week's reception. “He learned everything from his mother.”

Domenico said that the Astoria of his youth isn't exactly the same Astoria that you will find today.

“The neighborhood has gotten a lot younger and a lot more diverse,” he said.

Despite the changes, Sac's Place has always remained popular, even in today's flagging economy.

“Times are tough, but business has always been good,” Domenico said.

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