Work Wardrobe a Mess? Ben Wolff shows you how to 're-dress'
by Holly Tsang
Dec 01, 2009 | 5041 views | 0 0 comments | 253 253 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Image 1 / 2
Business Stylist Ben Wolff of re-dress(TM)
When Ben Wolff graduated from college with a degree in theater, he took a job in retail as a temporary means of supporting himself while he looked for acting gigs. He ended up keeping the retail job for many years, as is often the unsurprising story of the aspiring actor in New York City.

What did surprise Wolff was that the day job he’d only intended to keep for a short time culminated in the discovery of his true passion: people and clothing.

“I couldn’t live with myself selling something to someone that didn’t look good on them,” he said.

Perhaps it was his honesty that customers appreciated and which made him the top salesman at the company he worked for, but the part he enjoyed wasn’t making the sale. He loved playing with colors and patterns and putting attractive outfits together.

In 2003, Wolff started re-dress™ to help the fashionably challenged business professional, male and female. The mission of redress™ is to revamp a professional’s wardrobe using items that are already in his or her closet. Wolff guarantees at least 30 new outfits without breaking the bank.

After the new looks are created, he snaps photos and writes about them, then creates an individual fashion photo diary for each client. That way, they can easily recall what looks were created and track their personal progress.

“By making them look good, it makes me look good because people can say ‘Ben dressed me,’” said Wolff.

A good appearance matters now more than ever in an economic recession as throngs of people flock to job fairs looking for employment opportunities, said Wolff. Recruiters talk to hundreds, even thousands of people at these events, but the candidates who look sharpest will be the most memorable ones.

“The ones who are best dressed may not get the job interview, but they’re guaranteed to get the first look. I hate to say it, but looks count,” said Wolff.

Wolff said re-dress™ has been compared to the TLC show “What Not To Wear,” but he pointed out that he doesn’t force people to throw out their old clothes and give them money to buy new ones. Quite the opposite, actually.

And unlike the hosts of the show, who often make their clients cry, Wolff takes extra care to be honest but kind to his clients.

“What you choose to spend your money on says something about you. It’s a very personal and intimate thing, so that’s why I treat it that way,” he said.

With that being said, there are several things he stands firm on. He is a huge advocate of tailoring, which can completely transform an article of clothing without costing a lot.

He absolutely detests ties with cartoon characters and sport prints on them, which he believes draws attention away from an outfit and causes it to center on a really loud accessory.

“If you love tennis, bring it up in a conversation,” said Wolff. “Don’t let it become all about your tie.”

He listed the five types of ties that men should consider instead: a solid, a uniform geometric pattern, a narrow striped, a paisley and a power tie.

Wolff works with the clothing life of his clients to achieve looks that seamlessly transition from work to lunch to after-hours social events.

“You can be business without being boring. Classic looks never go out of style,” said Wolff. “It’s about a little bit of tweaking, and I know all the secrets.

In a move to make his work more accessible to people outside of NYC, he is in talks with producers about creating a reality television show. Share your story with him and it may be featured in a future episode of “Ben Wolff’s re-dress.”

In the meantime, Wolff offers several services: an in-home re-dress session, assisted shopping and group workshops. For more information, visit www.re-dress.net or call (917) 627-0745 for a free consultation.
Comments
(0)
Comments-icon Post a Comment
No Comments Yet