Queens Commuter
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August 01, 2015
There is so much wrong with LaGuardia, it is hard to know where to start. It has 2 short runways and no mass transit direct to Manhattan. The 2 runways are 7,000 ft. - by contrast, Newark has runways of 10,000 ft., JFK's longest is 12,000 ft. and the second longest in this area is at Stewart. LaGuaria's runways intersect, which further restricts operations. There are almost always birds in the area, and the city has just opened a new garbage handling facility near the runways. LaGuardia is built on fill, so it started to sink when it opened. Hydraulic jacks keep the main terminal from sinking any further. Steel supports were put in and seem to have stopped the subsidence but inadvertently have created electric fields above ground, so pilots are warned not to rely on compass readings at LaGuardia because of "electrical anomalies". The airport is in a flood plain, which means it is prone to flooding, and sea levels are rising. The whole airport is underwater every few years. The list goes on but the point is that the $4 billion plan proposed by Gov. Cuomo does not deal with this airport's fundamental problems. All we get is a nice waiting room where we can cool our heels. Really?
purplepeople
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August 01, 2015
You have to pay a monthly fee for groundskeeping as well. This is not bargain. The apartments are very small. Do not think that people are going to continue to pay such ridiculous prices.
Shameer Fazal
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July 31, 2015
It's is amazing how values have increased over the years. Real estate values are now higher than ever in all of Queens. Three bedroom apartments in Glen Oaks are now selling above $300,000. It's hard to find a home in Queens in this price range as prices are much higher throughout the Borough. We already have offers on this apartment above the asking price.
Is the Job Applicant’s Age a Factor You Consider When Hiring?
by cjleclaire
 Stephen Hans Blog
Jul 29, 2015 | 2293 views | 0 0 comments | 29 29 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink
Author: Stephen Hans

As a business owner, have you heard your manager claim that someone is too old to hire for a particular job? Or, have there been discussions that a younger person would be a better candidate for any number of reasons?

This line of thinking is something to watch out for because it very well may fall under age discrimination and put you at risk for an employment dispute or lawsuit.

Recently, the largest rent-a-car company in the nation, Enterprise Holdings Inc. settled a claim against its subsidiary Enterprise Rent-A-Car Company of Los Angeles. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) filed charges alleging that the Los Angeles location in Burbank, California denied 10 job applicants positions between 2008 and 2011 based on age. According to the EEOC, all of the applicants were age 40 and older, but the company hired younger less qualified candidates instead. The EEOC found that the company hired no applicants over 40 into their management trainee position during this three-year period. The Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA) prohibits age discrimination of persons who are 40 or older when hiring or promoting employees.

The company disputed the allegation and argued that it failed to hire the older applicants because they were less qualified.

However, rather than pay the expenses of litigation, Enterprise Rent-A-Car of Los Angeles settled for $425,000 and entered into a three-year conciliation agreement. Besides the monetary payment, conditions of the agreement included:

  • Redistribution of the company’s anti-discrimination policy to all employees in the L.A. metro area
  • EEO training emphasizing age discrimination for all staff
  • Maintenance of an appropriate record-keeping system
  • Public press release on the matter

No company is too large or too small to benefit from trustworthy legal defense when facing allegations of discrimination. Stephen Hans & Associates is glad to provide your business with effective legal guidance and representation.

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