Stop the plane noise
Oct 22, 2014 | 4 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Dear Editor: I am retired, 80 years old and trying to recover from multiple mini-strokes, two major strokes, and bleeding on the brain. The doctor told my wife that I was going to die, but here I am! The airplane noise has impacted my life and recovery, which is very slow. The airplanes departing LaGuardia Airport start at 6 a.m. and wake me. They are loud and mostly low. Most of the time, they fly right through the morning and afternoon into the evening. I sit on my front patio, but there is no peace and quiet. I cannot listen to the ballgame on my radio or have a conversation with my wife or anyone else. If the phone rings, I cannot hear what is being said and I cannot jump up and go inside my house because of my disability. The noise has an adverse effect on my cardiovascular system and my hearing. Something must be done to solve the airplane noise! Elected officials, please help to lower the noise level or eliminate it altogether. Force the FAA to have a different flight path, maybe over the water like it used to be. Sincerely, George T. Donahue Flushing
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Stop spread of Ebola, Mr. President
Oct 22, 2014 | 1 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Dear Editor: CDC director Dr. Tom Frieden assured Americans last week that “we know how to stop Ebola in its tracks.” Yet this week we learn of two new cases of Ebola, contracted by nurses who cared for Ebola patient Thomas Duncan at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas. Nurses at that hospital say there were fluctuating safety protocols, improper protective gear, a lack of treatment supplies, a lack of training, and no one to dispose of hazardous waste properly. We also hear that many other hospitals in the U.S. are not prepared to safely treat Ebola victims. President Barack Obama convened a special cabinet meeting to discuss the Ebola crisis. He called for an emergency response team that will provide aid in any future outbreaks, but still did not call for a travel ban to and from west Africa. Obama said about a month ago that Ebola was unlikely to reach our shores and that if it did it would not become widespread. Obviously it is here and it shows signs of an impending spread. The Ebola danger to Americans trumps all the weak arguments put forth by the Obama Administration against a travel ban. The screening measures that are taken at airports would not have caught Duncan. Without travel restrictions, there will be potentially many more individuals like Duncan who enter the country undetected, putting many of our citizens at risk. I urge the president to prioritize the safety of Americans over any ideological considerations preventing decisive actions to thwart the spread of Ebola. Imposing travel restrictions and securing our borders is an immediate first step. Citizens’ lives depend of how decisively the President acts as a leader now. I hope he does not let us down. Sincerely, Bob Weiss Astoria
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Save the trees
Oct 22, 2014 | 1 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Dear Editor: Once again, tree cutters have been in the Bayside area mangling trees on behalf of the utility company, apparently in this case Con Edison. They supposedly are clearing around the overhead wires, however one wonders how much punishment our precious street trees can take before succumbing from over-pruning. In some instances, the centers of trees have been cut out, or entire sides of trees are removed. This certainly can not be healthy for the trees and it most certainly destabilizes trees, making them more likely to fall during storms. It also can affect property values and defeats the benefits of why trees were planted in the first place. When the tree cutters were around previously, I learned that trees were being pruned by contractors with different levels of ability and low levels of supervision for compliance to American Standards Institute regulations that are supposed to be followed during tree pruning activity. The short-term solution to this problem is for utility companies like Con Edison to hire certified consultants when tree pruning is done. Cutting should be at a minimum for each tree. The long-term solution is for utility companies to place their wires underground. This also makes it less likely residents will lose power during storms. Utility companies balk at putting the wires underground due to the cost involved, but isn’t public safety and consistent service worth the effort? The trees would be thankful as well. Sincerely, Henry Euler Bayside
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