Zone 126 works with other local organizations to support a wide variety of educational programming, such as their City Growers collaboration to teach young people about how food is grown at the Brooklyn Grange rooftop farm in Long Island City.
Zone 126 works with other local organizations to support a wide variety of educational programming, such as their City Growers collaboration to teach young people about how food is grown at the Brooklyn Grange rooftop farm in Long Island City.
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Evil Arrows unveils the latest part of a yearlong EP series
by Andrew Shilling
Oct 01, 2014 | 98 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Brooklyn’s Bryan Scary is known for his work with the psych-pop band The Shredding Tears from back in the early 2000’s. Today his bandmates Graham Norwood on guitar, Everet Almond on lead guitar and vocals, and Adrian Perry on bass have joined Scary to form Evil Arrows.For the last year the band has been working on an EP project, releasing a new set of singles every couple of months. Playing the dives and clubs throughout Brooklyn and New York City, Scary has continued to pull from his psychedelic inspiration with his driving rock-based riffs and song structure. I spoke with Scary over the weekend about his new band, new release and their plans for the future. How did you form the band Evil Arrow? The group began as a recording project really, but it was me, a few other people and friends from other bands. I got the idea for it because I wrote a huge amount of songs in a short period of time and I wanted to just crank out recordings. I have another project which goes under my name, which has been around longer, and is more lavish conceptual productions. We do a lot of staged theatrics, but with this band I wanted to shed all of that. I wanted to work on the songs and home-recording them. Where are you guys from? I’m originally from Chicago and I’ve been in New York since 2001. Mike, the drummer, is from Long Island, Graham is from the San Francisco area and Adrian is from the Boston area, but we’ve all been living here for a long time. I came here for film originally, and I went to school for it. I’m still involved in that, but not quite as much. I think it’s a lot of like-minded people. It’s a certain kind of thinker and artist that gets attracted to this kind of city. Do you find there are a lot of like-minded people you can work with? I have a mixed feeling about that. I don’t know a lot of people that I can fully connect with on a musical level, but I have all sorts of musicians that I play with and write with. It sort of depends on the scene that you’re involving yourself with. I haven’t had trouble meeting people, but I personally have never been a scene kind of person. I sort of repel from scenes actually. How do you write your music? I’m pretty much always writing myself and I have multiple projects, and I’ll spend good portions of the day writing. I’m one of these people who have a lot of songs. It’s like the opposite of writer’s block for me. I have a lot going on and anything is pretty much down, it’s just a matter of figuring out how to use that. I think I write a certain kind of song on piano and a certain kind of song on guitar. You get very different results based on what instrument you’re writing on. The process for that is just play, find the hooks, and with some singing and writing we can put a structure around that. The lyrics are usually come later. Where did the name Evil Arrows come from? Not to take any greater meaning out of it, but it comes out of a passage in the Bible. But, band names are very difficult and I was just trying to think of a good one. It seemed like that particular book had been successful for many years so I just found a phrase that appealed to me. It had nothing to do with the actual phrase in the Bible. It just seemed like a good place to go. I sort of think band names take on the residence of the music. You don’t want to push too hard to match your music with your name. How do you find a niche in the Brooklyn music scene? It’s tricky because if you’re a band starting out, you don’t have a guaranteed amount of heads that will show up to all of your shows. You don’t want to be headlining really nice venues or expecting a certain amount of people, but at the same time you don’t want to be playing venues you don’t want to bring people to. So, I think the best way to do it is to get on a bill or find other bills and pair up with other bands, putting two heads together. It just creates more of a communal feeling at the show, and that’s always fun. You want to find venues and play places that have a reputation – a place that the press likes to go to – and the nature of the venue that you play at speaks to a certain degree on what you want people to think about when they think about your band. How do you find bands to partner up with? I think we’ll really play with anybody, but it’s much easier with this kind of band than it was with our older bands. The older band was a saccadic sounding and looking kind of experience and we didn’t really fit with anybody. The new band has much more potential to hook up with a lot of different kinds of sounds, but it is hard. What do you hope to bring your audience when you play your shows? I think that a show is something that someone should be fully engaged the entire time and not just background music. I like to keep things snappy and short and to the point, and just exciting. I’ve done a lot of costumes and visual things in the past and this is different. This is much more stripped down and the songs are really short and we crammed a lot into the set. It’s more of a constant energy for just a brief period of time, and it bursts if you know what I mean. What inspires you? It comes from all sorts of places. We have heroes in other bands that we look to for sure. For me, this band has a lot more late-70s punk, New Wave going on than ever before. So the Attractions, the Soft Boys and Robyn Hitchcock stuff. How long have you been working on your latest EP? Well it’s part of a series, and like I said before, it started as a recording project. We recorded six EPs over two years and we’ve been playing them all out over the course of the year. In January we released EP1 and now we’re up to EP4. We’ve been working on all this stuff since then and collecting songs for EPs over the years. It’s really like one giant album that you’re getting at the end of the year. We put the first three in a compilation, but that was released in Japan only, but we’re probably going to do that with the next three too. We will most likely release them all on vinyl, but at the moment we are just doing this digitally per EP. There are a lot of friends playing on them, so we have been finding out what the actual live lineup is going to be. Now that we have this very solid four-piece for the live show, I think our goal for next year is to continue writing with the four-piece and do an LP. Why do you think that has become the trend lately? I think it’s cheaper and quicker to do EPs, and no one is really buying LPs now. But an LP has been something that I wanted to do for a long time. To me it makes a bigger statement and people expect it to be as such, and there’s a lot of pressure behind it.This format is like, here’s a lot of songs that we’ve written check them out if you like us, as opposed to this is “Sgt. Peppers,” so it’s a little more causal. But if you’re a fan of the band, and they’re still putting their top work into it, then it’s still an exciting thing.
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SAINT MARY'S HIGH SCHOOL
Oct 01, 2014 | 106 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
51 Clapham Avenue Manhasset, NY, 11030 (516) 627 2711 website Co-ed, Catholic President: Mrs. Grace M. Cavallo Principal: Mr. Jonathan D. Kramer Students: 700 Teachers: 45 Average Class Size: 25 Extracurricular Activities: The Saint Mary’s experience encourages students to become fully involved members of our school community by participating in campus life and taking advantage of the variety of extracurricular offerings. From Student Council to clubs and sports, each student is able to explore their talents and skills outside the realm of academia. Students continue to forge friendships, build comradeship and team effort in the many supervised after school activities and interscholastic athletics such as lacrosse, soccer, badminton, track and swimming. In addition, students contribute to the community in various volunteer roles. All experiences build on character and leadership potential that help form a well-rounded and successful individual. Open House Date: Sunday, October 5, with presentations at 2, 2:45 & 3:30 p.m. St. Mary’s offers personal tours and shadowing opportunities by appointment throughout the year. Call (516) 627-2711 ext. 1079 to schedule an appointment. Admissions Director: Mr. Michael Ryan (516) 627-2711 ext. 1079, admissions@stmary.ws Percent of Seniors Attending College: 94 Top 2014 Seniors Attending: American University, Boston College, Boston University, Catholic University of America, Clemson University, Drexel University, Fairfield University, The George Washington University, Hofstra University, Johnson & Wales University, Loyola University Maryland, Marist College, New York University, Princeton University, Providence College, Purdue University, Rutgers University, University of Connecticut, University of Scranton, SUNY Binghamton, SUNY Geneseo, SUNY Maritime College, Temple University, and Villanova University. Most Attended College: Adelphi University, SUNY Binghamton, Boston College, Fairfield University, Fordham University, Hofstra University, Iona College, LIU Post, Molloy College, NYIT, Providence College, and St. John’s University. College Credit Courses: St. Mary’s offers Advanced Placement courses in English, World History, United States History, European History, Calculus, Spanish, Italian, Biology, Environmental Science and Computer Science. In addition, through a cooperative program with St. John’s and Adelphi Universities, students can earn college credit for courses in English, Language, American Government, College Algebra, Calculus, Computer Science and Psychology. Admissions Requirements: Grade Average, TACHS Score, CHSEE Score, Admissions Placement Test Mission Statement: Saint Mary’s High School was founded in 1949 and is an integral part of the ministry of St. Mary’s Parish. It is a Roman Catholic, coeducational community guided by the message of the Gospel in its commitment to nurturing each individual, engendering respect for the dignity of the human person, and maintaining the highest standards of academic excellence. The program of studies at St. Mary’s is designed to provide each student with a comprehensive college preparatory education with an emphasis on core curriculum skills. St. Mary’s recognizes individual differences by providing a range of levels for many courses: Advanced Placement, Honors, and Regents. St. Mary’s also offers unique elective courses to allow students who have met pre-requisites to explore specialized subjects. The Fine and Performing Arts Program at St. Mary’s is a vibrant active department where students focus on cultivating their talents in large and small group settings. Whether in the art studio, the orchestra, on or behind the stage, the students are working alongside professionals that provide an unparalleled learning experience of a lifetime. With the implementation of a One-to-One iPad Program for an entire high school, St. Mary’s remains a leader in technology with a state-of-the-art infrastructure. The program aims to enhance student motivation, higher order learning skills, study skills, and technology across content areas such as history, fine arts and sciences. St. Mary’s also offers the opportunity for students to participate in college level computer courses such as Introduction to Computer Programming, Advanced Placement Computer Science or participate in the Digital University Electives Program, which enables students to take elective courses from universities around the country. The lectures are viewed at home from the host university and moderated with SMHS faculty. Students can earn SMHS credit with each successfully completed course.
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Bishop Kearney seniors pick up their yearbooks and show off where they'll be attending college.
Bishop Kearney seniors pick up their yearbooks and show off where they'll be attending college.
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