A panel of executives discusses the future of real estate in LIC.
A panel of executives discusses the future of real estate in LIC.
slideshow
Real estate executives discuss change in LIC
by Patrick Kearns
Apr 28, 2015 | 0 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
A panel of executives discusses the future of real estate in LIC.
A panel of executives discusses the future of real estate in LIC.
slideshow
Executives from major city real state firms held a breakfast last week to discuss the future of growth and development in Long Island City. Discussion topics from a panel of experts included the general future development of Long Island City, the Sunnyside Yards property, the balance between residential, retail and commercial, and not over-saturating the area. “It’s incredibly exciting what’s going on now,” David Dishy, president of development and acquisition at L+M Partners, said. “I’m completely convinced we’re on the neighborhood-making side.” Since 2006, over 8,600 residential units have been built and there are over 22,000 still in the planning stages, according to Long Island City Partnership, which hosted the event. It’s not just the increased residential density that’s made Long Island City a hot neighborhood. Over 2 million square feet of class A office space has been developed since 2003 and 20 hotels have opened since 2008. There are 26 more in the development stages. “As Long Island City continues to evolve and thrive, we thought it was important to take a step back and examine how the area can use this growth to its advantage in the coming year,” said Elizabeth Lusskin, president of LIC Partnership. “LIC is home to a diverse mix of companies and residents, and it’s crucial that future development continues to leverage the area’s storied past and meet its future needs through the lens of dynamic current projects.” Long Island City has breathtaking views of Manhattan and has been touted as an “it” neighborhood by myriad media publications in the city. Thanks to massive growth in Brooklyn, more and more former Manhattanites and first-time New Yorkers are looking at Long Island City as a place to invest in and live. “What’s happened in Brooklyn has made the outer boroughs not only respectable, but dare I say desirable,” said Seble Tareke Williams, managing director of the NYC Interborough Fund at Emmes Asset Management Company. It’s also leading to higher property costs. According to the partnership, the average cost for condos in first quarter of 2015 were $678,333 for a studio, $820,000 for a one bedroom, and $1.1 million for a two-bedroom apartment. But those prices are still lower than prime Manhattan, which is leading to a lot of buying and density in Long Island City. The panel, which consisted of Tareke Williams, Dishy, Matthew Baron, president of Simon Baron Development, and Jon Caplan, vice chairman of the New York Capital Markets Group at Jones Lang LaSalle, also discussed specific developments and how to bring in bigger anchor retail stores. “I think there is a dearth of larger spaces,” Baron said. “At least the space they’d want to be in.” He did say that he thinks the real estate companies are creating enough density to bring a lot of really great, high-quality retail to the area. The panel also discussed the much-maligned Sunnyside Yards property, which divides Long Island City. Some developers have built around the area, but the massive parcel of land remains undisturbed. “I’d love to say that something would happen in my lifetime,” Tareke Williams said. “It’s one of the largest unused land parcels in the city. It can’t be ignored.” Dishy said the key is to not let the grandiosity of the site get in the way of incremental progress. Developers need to build the area slowly, as it’s not a project that can happen overnight. The panel was moderated by David Brause, president of Brause Real Estate, who spoke positively about the morning discourse. “Today’s breakfast featured a very enthusiastic discussion among some of the area’s industry leaders on the growth and demand for real estate in Long Island City,” he said. “The general consensus is that it’s a great time to be in this market, and that the area will only continue to take off in the coming years.”
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Joseph Kane
Apr 28, 2015 | 25 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Joseph Kane passed away on Friday, April 24, 2015 at the age of 90. Beloved Husband of Theresa. Loving Father of Anthony, Marie Evangelista, and Joseph Jr. Cherished Grandfather of Sarah, Lisa and Jay Jay and Great-Grandmother of Valentino and Eva. Religious Services were offered at Papavero Funeral Home on Wednesday, April 29, 2015 Interment followed at Pinelawn Memorial Park, Farmingdale, NY under the direction of Papavero Funeral Home, 72-27 Grand Avenue, Maspeth, NY 11378 www.papaverofuneralhome.com
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Rudoplh V. Aiello
Apr 28, 2015 | 11 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Rudoplh V. Aiello passed away on Saturday, April 25, 2015 at the age of 79. Beloved Husband of Marie A. Loving Father of Rudy Jr., Randy (Karen), Ricky and the late Nancy. Cherished Grandfather of Vinny, Nicky and Dominick. Dear Brother of the late Ralph, Sal, Rose, and Peter. Mass of Christian Burial was offered at St. Margaret’s Church on Wednesday, April 29, 2015 at 10:30 AM Interment followed at Calverton National Cemetery, Calverton, NY under the direction of Papavero Funeral Home, 72-27 Grand Avenue, Maspeth, NY 11378 www.papaverofuneralhome.com
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EEOC Files Its First of Two Transgender Discrimination Lawsuits
by cjleclaire
 Stephen Hans Blog
Apr 28, 2015 | 34 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

New York employers should take note that the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) filed and settled its first transgender discrimination lawsuit. In April 2015, the EEOC brought the suit against Lakeland Eye Clinic in Florida (http://www.eeoc.gov/eeoc/newsroom/release/4-13-15.cfm) but avoided trial by negotiating a pre-litigation settlement for $150,000 during its conciliation process.

The issue being litigated involved discrimination based on sex, alleging that the company fired its Director of Hearing Services after the employee began to present as a women, transitioning from male to female. The employee had performed at her job satisfactorily throughout her tenure as director, and the lawsuit alleged that she was fired because she became transgender and the company claimed this change did not conform with the employer's gender-based stereotypes. However, Title VII of the Civil Rights Act protects employees against sex discrimination. The EEOC commended Lakeland Eye Clinic for settling the dispute and agreeing to provide its managers and employees with training that educated them against transgender discrimination. 

At the federal level, this is a landmark case that sets a precedent for other transgender anti-discrimination cases brought before the EEOC.

At a state level, New York has had laws in place since 2002, under The Sexual Orientation Non-Discrimination Act (SONDA) (http://www.ag.ny.gov/civil-rights/sonda-brochure), which prohibit discrimination in employment based on actual or perceived sexual orientation, and this also extends to transgender issues.

If you are a business owner and have questions or disputes involving sexual orientation discrimination, Stephen Hans & Associates (http://www.hansassociates.com/) can help. Our firm provides representation to companies involved in anti-discrimination litigation and brings decades of experience to every case we handle.

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