Board discusses Glendale yeshiva expansion with center
by Andrew Shilling
Jul 25, 2014 | 359 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Overcrowding at a Glendale yeshiva has led the owners to begin a dialogue with the local community board over expansion. Community Board 5 (CB5) chair Vincent Arcuri said he and other board members met with representatives of the United Talmudic Seminary, located at 73-10 99th St., to discuss ways to create a more comfortable environment for their students. “They’re interested in expanding and with different classrooms and more comfortable classrooms,” Arcuri said. “The objective would be to reduce the number of buses traveling back and forth, and figure out how to take care of all the students.” Currently, the school has roughly 14 buses making the trip from Williamsburg every morning, according to Arcuri, bringing in so many students that there is only an estimated 23 inches of space per student. He added that while the center has started the discussion for expansion, they mentioned they did not want the additional space to translate to more students. “They don’t want to go over a certain number because if it’s too many students, then it’s no longer a great teaching venue,” he said. While Yeshiva member Abraham Markowitz acknowledged discussions with the board to expand the center, he denied comment until a later date. A spokesperson with the Department of Housing Preservation and Development said the landlord has not made any filings since February 2013. “That was for the modification of an existing fire suppression system in the kitchen,” the spokesperson said. Glendale Civic Association president and CB5 member Kathy Masi noted the center sits on potentially contaminated property and is a poor space for a school, so she is currently against the proposal. “I think that I must be the only original opponent of building the yeshiva,” Masi said. “The other opponents are either in bed with them or working for elected officials or both.” Masi also noted the yeshiva's close proximity to a proposed 125-family transitional housing facility on Cooper Avenue. “They are just not looking at the bigger picture down the line,” she said.
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Myrtle Ave businesses say 104th inspecting possible assault
by Andrew Shilling
Jul 25, 2014 | 20 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Business owners along Myrtle Avenue jumped on their social media last week after, they say, 104th Precinct detectives asked for their security camera data for an apparent assault at approximately 1 a.m. on the morning of July 15 near Myrtle Avenue and 84th Street. Michelle Cook Lopez, manager of Cooks Arts and Crafts at 80-09 Myrtle Avenue, said two detectives questioned her and asked about their security camera systems. “They showed me a picture of the man in a hospital bed with a swollen face and asked if I recognized him,” Lopez said. “These were detectives with badges and said if I had any information to call the 104th.” However, a spokesperson from the NYPD public affairs unit said there was only one assault that day in the precinct, but it was at a private residence on Putnam Avenue; the other side of the community from the alleged assault. And 104th Precinct Community Affairs Officer Thomas Bell said he was unaware of any crime. “I have no information about that,” Bell said. “This is new knowledge to me.” Lopez, who is also a member of the Glendale Property Owners civic group, said she does not see as many officers patrolling her community in comparison to other parts of the precinct, so an assault is not surprising. “Glendale in general I think is a wonderful neighborhood, but it gets very quiet at night,” Lopez said. “ A lot of desperate people know this is a dead area at night, and we need more police down here.” The reported attack comes just one year after local elected officials announced $250,000 in funding to place 14 security cameras in and around Forest Park, something Lopez says could have helped the detectives who visited her business. “I remember recently we were supposed to get a camera across the street because of the rapist that was loose in the park last year,” Lopez said. “I see that there is a power supply and an arm to hold up the camera, but there is still no camera, and that’s been about a year.” Miller said he spoke with concerned residents about the alleged attack, and assured he is still working with the NYPD to finalize paperwork to install the cameras “They need to complete their part of the application and send it in,” Miller said. The assemblyman said he sent the paperwork to the department for approval more than two months ago, and has been in constant contact to pressure them for a signature. “It’s a lengthy process,” he said. “Once it gets back to us, it could take a few months.” One of the cameras is slated for 80th Street and Myrtle Avenue, which would have recorded whatever happened the morning of July 15. “It would have picked up whatever happened on the street,” Miller said. “They’re 10 times better than a camera on the outside of a building or a store.”
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Garbage piles up on Grand Avenue where bins once stood
by Andrew Shilling
Jul 25, 2014 | 184 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Garbage piles up on Grand Avenue where a city waste basket once stood.
Garbage piles up on Grand Avenue where a city waste basket once stood.
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So what happens if public trashcans regularly overflow with trash? 
Well, according to the Department of Sanitation (DSNY) the wasted baskets will be removed, especially if the department believes they are being used by residents to illegally dispose of household garbage. “DSNY will remove baskets if they are being misused, or if the location no longer meets the requirements for litter basket placement,” explained a representative of the DSNY. On Grand Avenue, several residents and business owners have watched the large metal baskets appear and disappear on dozens of corners throughout the business district. After one can was recently removed because nearby homeowners were regularly dumping large quantities of trash, the location became a dumping ground for trash bags and litter. “I have never in my entire life seen anything like this, ever,” said one 61-year-old resident who has lived on the block since she was a child as she passed by a heaping pile of ripped garbage bags on the street. “New people that move in, they don’t care so they throw their garbage anywhere.” The resident chose to remain anonymous due to the fear of backlash from the neighborhood, as did local business owners who discussed the issue under the pretense that their names would be kept confidential. “Garbage comes from the tenants who live up Grand Avenue, whose landlords don’t supply garbage cans, and they don’t wait for the weekly pickup,” one business owner said. The shop owner explained that the same residents are dumping trash where the bin once stood, leaving them and other business owners responsible for the cleanup. “We’re responsible to keep our area clean, and it’s impossible to keep our area clean with all this garbage,” the owner said. DSNY acknowledged the problem on Grand Avenue, and assured they are working with their enforcement division to find new ways, “to achieve a higher rate of compliance from residents and businesses so that existing baskets are not misused.” “We will also revisit the adopt-a-basket program in the area once again, and look for the community board to encourage its constituents who own businesses in the areas of concern to perhaps adopt a basket as well,” the representative added.
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Fundraising efforts lead to scholarships for two students
by Andrew Shilling
Jul 25, 2014 | 90 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Kiwanis members present a check to Michael Urbano and Vivienne Crowe for their fundraising efforts.
Kiwanis members present a check to Michael Urbano and Vivienne Crowe for their fundraising efforts.
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As Michael Urbano and Vivienne Crowe both prepare to head to school at Archbishop Malloy in the fall, the two accepted $500 scholarships from the Kiwanis Club of Maspeth last week for their fundraising efforts with Project Eliminate. While attending Our Lady of Hope in Middle Village, Crowe and Urbano sold well over 900 fuzzy koala bear-themed pencils for the Kiwanis club’s fundraising program, helping raise more than $2,000 towards curing maternal and neonatal tetanus (MNT). “You just feel really accomplished that you could help someone that much by doing something so simple,” Crowe said. “It’s just a great cause to donate to.” MTN takes the lives of nearly 60,000 babies as well as their mothers each year. Kiwanis and UNICEF have teamed up to raise more than $52 million through Project Eliminate, close to the halfway mark of their total goal. The two local student and their families accepted the checks from Kiwanis members at Astoria Federal on Metropolitan Avenue last week. Urbano recalled he and Crowe starting off their schooldays selling the pencils to their friends and being surprised by the response. “We raised a ton of money,” Urbano said. “A lot of the kids really enjoyed the koalas and the pencils, but they really just wanted to help out the kids who have tetanus.” This was the first scholarship award given out by the Maspeth Kiwanis Club this year, and Kiwanis president Al Gentile said he looks forward to next year. “We hope to expand this to more students with more money next year,” Gentile said. “It’s our first initiative and we’re very excited about it.”
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Basketball Sneakers Queens
Basketball Sneakers Queens
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