Morty Weinberg takes his first look at the new memorial dedicated to his son at O'Neill's Bar and Restaurant in Maspeth.
Morty Weinberg takes his first look at the new memorial dedicated to his son at O'Neill's Bar and Restaurant in Maspeth.
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Maspeth hero remembered at O’Neill’s Bar and Restaurant
by Andrew Shilling
Oct 30, 2014 | 39 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Morty Weinberg takes his first look at the new memorial dedicated to his son at O'Neill's Bar and Restaurant in Maspeth.
Morty Weinberg takes his first look at the new memorial dedicated to his son at O'Neill's Bar and Restaurant in Maspeth.
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When O’Neill’s Bar and Restaurant was destroyed in a fire three years ago, much more than just an iconic Maspeth staple was left behind in the rubble. The family-run business, located at 64-21 53rd Dr., was also home to priceless sports memorabilia - autographs from Michael Jordan to Brian Leech - all of which was lost on that day. On Thursday night, restaurant owner George O’Neill surprised the family of Maspeth firefighter Mike Weinberg, a local hero that lost his life on September 11, 2001, with a dedicated wall to their late son’s days as a standout baseball player with St. John’s University. “We were able to bring out some of his old friends and his family, so I think everything worked out just fine,” O’Neill said after unveiling a replica of Weinberg’s number 22 baseball jersey and memorial in a surprise ceremony for his family. “It will stay there, as long as we don’t have a fire, maybe forever.” Morty Weinberg, Mike’s father, said he had no idea O’Neill and his friends were planning the surprise event, adding, however, that he was happy they did. “I think it’s very nice,” Morty said. “He has always been doing very nice things like that. He has a very good heart.” Mike was off duty and on his way to the golf course when he got word that a plane flew into the World Trade Center. His father said it was then when he made his way to Ground Zero to help. “He was very unlucky,” Morty said. “When he came out of the building, that’s when they came down.” Today Morty lives in Florida, but visits often and stops by St. John’s Cemetery - where his son is buried - every day he is in town. “Anybody who knows him, remembers him,” he said. “This is just a good memory thing for Michael.”
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Watercolor paintings from the “Eulogies” art exhibit by artist Steve Cavallo currently hanging at the KHRCA.
Watercolor paintings from the “Eulogies” art exhibit by artist Steve Cavallo currently hanging at the KHRCA.
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KHRCA executive director joined KAAGNY to announce a new permanent art exhibit dedicated to the Korean Comfort Women at QCC.
KHRCA executive director joined KAAGNY to announce a new permanent art exhibit dedicated to the Korean Comfort Women at QCC.
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Permanent Comfort Women exhibit on the way at QCC
by Andrew Shilling
Oct 30, 2014 | 11 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
KHRCA executive director joined KAAGNY to announce a new permanent art exhibit dedicated to the Korean Comfort Women at QCC.
KHRCA executive director joined KAAGNY to announce a new permanent art exhibit dedicated to the Korean Comfort Women at QCC.
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Watercolor paintings from the “Eulogies” art exhibit by artist Steve Cavallo currently hanging at the KHRCA.
Watercolor paintings from the “Eulogies” art exhibit by artist Steve Cavallo currently hanging at the KHRCA.
slideshow
Queensborough Community College (QCC) announced the construction of a permanent exhibit in honor of the Korean Comfort Women of WWII today at the Kupferberg Holocaust Center and Archives (KHRCA), located at 222-05 56th Street in Bayside. The opening art display of the new exhibition by artist Steve Cavallo entitled, "Eulogies," shows numerous watercolor portraits of the Korean teenage girls, forced into sexual servitude by Japanese armies in 1937. With an estimated cost ranging from $50,000 to $80,000, the new exhibit is expected to add to the awareness of these young women and survivors by engaging the students and surrounding community. Three years ago, KHRCA executive director Arthur Flug began working with The Korean American Association of Greater New York (KAAGNY) to further the education surrounding the issue. Since then, they have worked together to create a partnership between the two communities out of the tragedies experienced in WWII. “When we were approached by the people of the Korean community - who said can you please help us with this - the more we looked at it, we couldn’t find a reason to say no,” Flug explained. “What was happening to these young women in Asia during WWII, was happening to the people who are Holocaust survivors today.” Since teaming up with KAAGNY, Flug said both Holocaust and Comfort Women survivors have met and formed what they call the Sisterhood of Survivors. “Now there are very few people on campus who have not heard of the Comfort Women,” he said. “People come in here, not because they’ve been assigned to do a project by their professors, but they heard of the Comfort Women and they want to see the exhibit.” With the new exhibit, Flug said the school plans on finding new ways of engaging the students as well as potentially releasing a new speaker program to further the discussion. KAAGNY president Sung K. Min joined Flug at the KHRCA to announce the pending opening of the new exhibit. “This is not a political issue, this is a human rights issue,” Min said through the help of a translator. “This is to raise awareness and to protect our countrymen and women.”
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