Russell’s return, Dinwiddie’s revenge as Nets win two to end the week
Jan 22, 2018 | 714 views | 0 0 comments | 6 6 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Two months after tearing his right meniscus, D’Angelo Russell returned for the Brooklyn Nets on Friday, January 19, as the team hosted the Miami Heat at Barclays Center. The roar of the crowd was thunderous as Russell entered for the game for the first time with 4:28 remaining in the opening stanza. As expected, Russell was rusty, and on a minutes limit. Therefore, expectations were lowered before the game even began, as Russell was listed as “probable,” which in the NBA normally translates to “he’ll play, just not that much.” Nets head coach Kenny Atkinson also said that the team would build Russell up and ease him into more minutes as time goes. Considering that Russell has played two games since his return at 14 minutes each, scoring only four points on 1-of-10 shooting with three assists, patience and tempered expectations seems to be ideal. “Russell was obviously rusty, which is normal,” Atkinson said. “You could see he got in rhythm. He got to the rim and missed a layup but it was a good drive. He’s got a feel as a quarterback, as a point guard of getting guys shots.” For the Nets, it’s good to have Russell back, but it’s even better to end the week with back-to-back victories after losing to the San Antonio Spurs and New York Knicks earlier in the week. Though Russell hasn’t been a huge impact player yet, the Nets managed to defeat the Heat, 101-95, and follow it up with a 101-100 victory over the Detroit Pistons on Sunday, after a game-winning jumper from rising star Spencer Dinwiddie, who was drafted by those same Pistons in the second round of the 2014 NBA Draft. The 6-foot-6 guard was a nondescript back-up with Detroit, who even spent time in the former NBA D League from 2014-2016 before being traded to the Chicago Bulls, where he was subsequently waived in October 2016. The Nets signed him that December. Dinwiddie had 22 points on 9-of-13 shooting from the field and drained 4-of-6 from three-point range to accompany five assists and four rebounds against his former NBA team of two seasons. “You know, a win is a good win,” Dinwiddie said, fighting laughter, when asked how the victory felt, seeming to knowingly avoid mentioning the desired storyline behind the money shot. “For our young team, anytime you can grind out a win, especially when they come back, we still learned how to close it out and get just enough stops, just enough buckets. It’s big time.” The Nets, who are 18-29 after beating Detroit, are now six games out of the eighth spot in the Eastern Conference despite serious injuries to key players, including Jeremy Lin, who is out for the season. The Nets are also three games behind the New York Knicks, who they’ll face on January 30 at Madison Square Garden for the final time this season.
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St. John’s now 0-8 in Big East after double OT loss
Jan 22, 2018 | 126 views | 0 0 comments | 6 6 recommendations | email to a friend | print
The St. John’s men’s basketball team dropped its first double-overtime contest since 2014 on Saturday, falling on the road to Georgetown, 93-89. Leading by five with 24 seconds remaining in the first overtime period, the Johnnies (10-10, 0-8 Big East) saw Georgetown erase the deficit with a 6-1 spurt before the Hoyas (13-6, 3-5) scored the first six points of the second extra stanza to pull away at home. With eight straight losses to open conference play, head coach Chris Mullin said it’s getting harder to stay optimistic. “It’s definitely a test,” he said. “We got to keep battling, work through it, believe in each other, keep the faith, stay diligent, and we’ll get there.” The Red Storm appeared to have victory in its grasps toward the end of the first extra period, but let a five-point lead slip away in the final 24 seconds. Marcus Derrickson closed the stanza on a personal 6-1 run, draining a three-ball with three seconds remaining, knotting the contest at 79. Mullin was asked after the game if he would have liked to foul Derrickson before he could get the game-tying shot off. “Not coming out of a timeout, it’s kind of hard to get these guys’ attention on the way up, but ideally yeah,” he said. “Philosophically, yeah I like to foul in that situation. We couldn’t get the message over there coming off the free throw.” Shamorie Ponds tallied his second 30-point effort in the team’s last three outings, scoring 33 points to go along with eight assists, six rebounds and three steals. The Brooklyn native made 12 of his 23 tries from the floor and three of his seven attempts from three-point range. Before fouling out in the first overtime period, Tariq Owens netted 17 points on 8-of-14 shooting. The Big East’s leading shot blocker also added three swats and seven rebounds. Marvin Clark II tallied 15 points and four rebounds, sinking three triples in the process. Also finishing in double figures for the Johnnies was Bashir Ahmed, who chipped in 11 points and six boards. Justin Simon registered eight points, 10 rebounds, seven assists, four steals and two blocks. The effort marked his sixth of the season with double-digit boards. St. John’s was scheduled to return to action on Tuesday, playing host to Creighton at 8:30 p.m. at Carnesecca Arena.
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Comeback for Queens College
Jan 22, 2018 | 114 views | 0 0 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print
A heroic comeback led by Merrick Rowland and Lucy Tougas spurred the Queens College women’s basketball team to a 70-60 triumph over Damen College on Sunday in Flushing. Beth Bonin led the way 20 points, hitting 7-of-8 from the free throw line in the late stages of the game to elevate the Knights (8-8, 4-4 ECC) to a win. Rowland had 15 points and Marina Ramon Lopez scored 14 points as well, but Tougas had herself a game with eight points off the bench to go along with three rebounds and two assists. Ramon Lopez grabbed ten rebounds to record another double-double in the win as Emer Moloney played a pivotal role with seven points and six assists to boot. Queens returns to action on Wednesday, when the Knights host St. Thomas Aquinas College at 5:30 p.m. in a game that will be streamed live on ESPN3.
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Five-game win streak ends for St. John's women
Jan 22, 2018 | 113 views | 0 0 comments | 9 9 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Following a week-long layoff, the St. John’s women fell to Seton Hall on Sunday afternoon, 62-57, in New Jersey. The loss halted a five-game win streak for the Red Storm (12-8, 5-4 Big East) and gave the Pirates (12-8, 4-5) their third win in four tries. Alisha Kebbe led the Johnnies in points with 15, including a trio of 3-pointers, while Maya Singleton grabbed a game-high 12 rebounds. The senior, who ranks in the top five nationally in double-doubles, fell short of that mark with only six points. Qadashah Hoppie also reached double figures for St. John’s, scoring 11 points. Facing the conference’s leader in steals per game, the Johnnies won the turnover battle, committing just 16 while forcing 22 Seton Hall miscues. St. John’s will return to action on Friday with a trip to Omaha for a showdown with Creighton at 8 p.m.
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Six things you should know about cervical cancer
by Dr. Wayne Kye
Jan 22, 2018 | 111 views | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
January is Cervical Health Awareness Month. Although cervical cancer is discussed more now than in the past, many women still know little about the disease. About 13,200 women in the U.S. will be diagnosed with cervical cancer in 2018 and more than 4,100 will die of the disease. In New York state alone, 870 women will be diagnosed with cervical cancer. Most cervical cancers can be prevented by getting vaccinated for the human papillomavirus (HPV) and by getting recommended cancer screenings beginning at age 21. But there is more you should know about this disease: 1. Nearly all cervical cancers are caused by HPV. The virus, which is spread through sexual contact, is responsible for more than 90 percent of all cervical cancer cases. HPV is very common in the U.S., infecting nearly one in every four Americans, but most infections won’t lead to cancer. (In addition to cervical cancer, certain types of HPV are linked to anal, oropharyngeal, vaginal, vulvar and penile cancers). 2. The HPV vaccine is most effective when given to preteens, but teens and young adults who have not already been vaccinated should also receive it. The HPV vaccine is recommended for 11- to 12-year-old girls and boys. Research shows the immune system response is strongest at this age—well before they become sexually active. The vaccine is also recommended for females ages 13 to 26 and most males ages 13 to 21 who haven’t already completed the vaccine series. 3. African-American and Hispanic women are more likely to be diagnosed with and die of cervical cancer. The rate of cervical cancer for Hispanic women in the U.S. is about 44 percent higher than non-Hispanic whites. The rate is similar for African-American women, who are twice as likely as white women to die of the disease. These disparities are caused in part by lower screening rates for minorities due to cultural and socioeconomic factors. 4. Smoking increases your risk for cervical cancer. Women who smoke are twice as likely to develop cervical cancer as those who don’t. Smoking can also weaken the immune system’s response to HPV. 5. Your Pap test can help you prevent cervical cancer (or detect it early). A pelvic exam and Pap test can reveal precancerous conditions of the cervix that do not usually cause symptoms. Begin regular cervical cancer screening at age 21, even if you have been vaccinated for HPV. Women in their twenties should have a Pap test every three years. For women ages 30-65, the preferred way to screen is with a Pap test combined with an HPV test every five years, or a Pap test every three years. 6. An abnormal Pap test does not mean you have cervical cancer. Most abnormal tests are caused by HPV, but most types of HPV don’t result in cancer. Typically, abnormal cells can be monitored and will go away on their own, but the most serious cell abnormalities can lead to cervical cancer if left untreated. If you have an abnormal Pap test, your health care professional may recommend further testing to clarify the initial results and determine if treatment is necessary, depending on your age and family history. (Statistics provided by the American Cancer Society, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Cancer Institute.) To learn more about cervical cancer prevention, symptoms and treatment, visit preventcancer.org/cervical. Dr. Wayne Kye is the spouse of Congresswoman Grace Meng and a member of the Prevent Cancer Foundation’s Congressional Families Cancer Prevention Program.
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