The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (also known as ObamaCare)
by cjleclaire
 Stefans Law Group
Jan 29, 2015 | 78 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink
Author; Donna Stefans

Re:Obamacare

The Health insurance reporting requirements on the 2014 tax return are a bit complicated. If you and your family were covered by an employer health care plan for all 12 months in 2014, there is no need for further clarification. Your return will be processed by simply checking the box to affirm that you had coverage all year.

If you had any months without medical insurance or obtained your insurance through a state or federal health insurance exchange, please read this important information.

Taxpayers not covered for health insurance for a portion of 2014

These taxpayers will need to report each month without coverage for each applicable family member (taxpayer, spouse and dependents) on the tax return. A penalty of up to 1% of adjusted gross income may apply. However, there are many exemptions to the penalty. We will be sure to review them when we prepare your tax return to ensure that you don’t pay a penalty if it can be legally avoided.

Taxpayers covered for health insurance through a state or federal exchange

A premium subsidy credit may have been applied by the exchange. This amount was estimated based upon the income declared on the application. The 2014 tax return will be used to validate the credit entitlement. This may result in an additional tax credit due (increase the refund) or the need to decrease a credit already received (additional tax due). You should be receiving form 1095-A from the exchange, showing the premium credit, and other information. Please be sure to bring that form in to us so we can correctly handle the reporting on your tax return.

Beginning in 2015, nearly all individual taxpayers will receive a new annual information reporting form from employers and/or insurance companies (forms 2095-B or 1095-C). These forms will be needed when completing the 2015 return. We suggest you save them with your other tax documents.

As always, we are here to support you. Feel free to call us with any questions you may have.
We wish you all a Happy, Healthy, Prosperous New Year.

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A Different Slant on Class-Based Hiring Discrimination
by cjleclaire
 Stephen Hans Blog
Jan 29, 2015 | 105 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink
Author: Stephen D. Hans

Most employers are familiar with the pitfalls of discriminating against applicants in protected classes under Civil Rights laws. For the most part, African Americans, Hispanics and other minority groups experience the brunt of this type of discrimination. Some companies bend over backwards to accommodate Hispanic and Spanish-speaking job candidates so they can show diversity in hiring. However, recently a case brought by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) had a different twist.

The EEOC charged Lawler Foods, Inc. and Lawler Foods, Ltd. in Houston, Texas with discrimination against African-American and non-Hispanic applicants.

Since 2007, Lawler staff who were hiring for the company had been telling non-Hispanic applicants that they could not hire them because they were not Hispanic or did not speak Spanish. Statistical and anecdotal evidence showed the following about Lawler Foods’ treatment of non-Hispanic applicants:
• Rude behavior towards them
• Making them wait endlessly for interviews while at the same time interviewing Hispanic applicants
• Non-Hispanic applicants typically having better qualifications of more education and more relevant work experience than Hispanic applicants, but not being hired
• Reliance on word-of-mouth hiring
• Advertising that indicated a preference for Spanish-speaking applicants

When the EEOC could not reach a settlement with Lawler Foods, it pursued a lawsuit, alleging that the Lawler companies were in violation of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act. Company employers had excluded people on the basis of national origin or race, and this was, in effect, class-based recruitment.

Employers who face unusual employment situations should consult with an employment defense attorney to ensure their policies and hiring practices are in compliance with discrimination laws. Our attorneys at Stephen Hans & Associates have extensive experience as employment defense lawyers and can help you deal with employment related disputes and litigation.

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Tom M
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January 29, 2015
The issue of the homeless starts with tenants not paying their rents. It would be MUCH less expensive to increase rent subsidies and keep these families in their homes and communities. The WAREHOUSING of the homeless in converted factories is the real crime being committed by the DHS.
Joseoh
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January 29, 2015
Not sure whose responsibility it is, but the issue of the HOMELESS is becoming more and more of an issue, when it had not been. If anyone travels the subway in the evening hours, especially those coming to the Borough of Queens on the E and F trains, one can SMELL and SEE it. Where have they all come from! And so yes, someone, whether our BP or the MAYOR must address this concern.