jimmyturano/broker
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July 12, 2014
Looking for an apartment-updated July 12, 2014 Ideas to benefit you. With plenty of competition out there looking for the same apartment that you are looking for, do you think it is a good idea to: Have on hand three months rent(security,rent, and real estate fee) in case you find what your looking for? Have on hand some copies of paychecks? Have on hand your credit scores? Since there are many looking for apartments today, it would be in your best interest to look like the perfect candidate for the apartment, in front of the landlord. Landlords are looking for tenants who will live in the same house as them. There concern is to attain tenants that can afford to pay them. If you see an apartment you like, negotiate, and you tell the landlord you want the apartment, but you can't leave a deposit, or pay within 24 hours, you do not look good to the landlord in their eyes. To many embarassing stories to tell lately. Just shop for an apartment when you are ready with the money needed, and have your paperwork ready to show.
Upon relesae, activist vows to fight for prison inmates
by Natasha Tyrell
Jul 11, 2014 | 699 views | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Cecily McMillian, an Occupy Wall Street activist, was released from prison this past Monday after serving 90 days at Rikers Island for assaulting a police officer. According to the charges, McMillian elbowed Officer Bovell in the face, however she claimed it was in self-defense after she says he grabbed her chest so hard during an Occupy Wall Street protest that it left a bruise. McMillian entered Rikers Island as an Occupy Wall Street activist, but is leaving as an activist for women prisoners. “Incarceration is meant to prevent crime. Its purpose is to penalize and then return us to the outside world ready to start anew,” McMillian said. “The world I saw at Rikers isn’t concerned with that. Many of the tactics employed seem to be aimed at simple dehumanization.” Today she is speaking out for the women of the Rikers Island wing known as the Rose M. Singer Center. Her goal is to improve the functionality of the system and provide the inmates with more rights as they serve their sentence. “On the outside, I spent my time fighting for freedom and rights, on the inside I discovered a world where words like freedom and rights don’t even exist in the first place,” she said. While serving out her 90-day sentence, McMillian teamed up with her fellow inmates on a list of demands to make prison more humane. The first demand is that inmates are provided with sufficient health care in a timely manner, including mental care services. McMillian said she recently loss her friend Judith, a fellow inmate, due to malpractice. The inmate’s death followed a period of coughing up blood after her methadone prescription was increased. She was refused medical care. The second demand is implementing regulations to require correctional officers to follow the protocol that is spelled out in the inmate handbook. This would include a better system of filing complaints against officers. McMillian explains direct examples of how inmate’s complaints aren’t taken seriously and often doctored in the favor of the officer. “Inmates should be able to trust that situations like that will not occur and our safety and dignity be respected by those designated to supervise us,” she said. The final demand is that the women of Rikers Island be provided with more educational services. “We will continue to fight until we gain all the rights we are deserving as a citizen of this city, of this state, and the United States of America,” McMillian said.
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City to award $23 million to improve arts education
by Jess Berry
Jul 11, 2014 | 507 views | 0 0 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print
For those worried about the future of creativity for students in schools that are focusing more and more on standardized testing and investing less time in cultivating imaginative thinking, there is some good news. In an attempt to fight the persistent decline of the arts, the city will spend an additional $23 million on arts in schools this year. Mayor Bill de Blasio, Comptroller Scott Stringer and Chancellor Carmen Farina announced last week that much of the funding will be spent on training and hiring teachers, arts facilities improvements and arts materials. “Mayor de Blasio’s commitment of $23 million for expanded arts education marks an important down payment in our ongoing effort to make sure that every city student, in every neighborhood, has access to a meaningful arts education,” Stringer said. In his recent “State of the Arts” report, Stringer cited a study from the Department of Education (DOE) showing that over the past seven years, there has been a 47 percent cut in spending on cultural vendors and arts and an additional 84 percent decline in spending on arts supplies and equipment. This decline has most adversely affected neighborhoods in South Bronx and Central Brooklyn. Stringer writes in his report that, while these neighborhoods are home to just 31 percent of city schools, more than 42 percent of the city’s schools that lack either full-time or part-time certified arts teacher are located in the South Bronx or Central Brooklyn. Additionally, 34 percent of all city schools that do not have dedicated arts rooms are located in these two neighborhoods. In total, 419 schools citywide, or 28 percent, lack a full-time certified arts teacher. New York State law requires that students in grades 7-12 be taught by a certified arts teacher, but 22 percent of all middle schools and 20 percent of all high schools are not compliant. Of those 419 schools, 306 have neither a full-time nor a part-time certified arts teacher. Outside of staffing, facilities are also a problem. Ten percent of schools have no dedicated arts room, Stringer reports. In order to address these issues, the city has allocated $5 million to hire a total of 120 certified arts teachers. A large portion of that money will go towards offsetting personnel costs to hire 100 certified arts teachers, who will work in 50 pairs of middle schools. The rest of that funding will allow 20 new teachers to enter a fully subsidized two-year certification program through Lincoln Center and Hunter College. Another $7.5 million will be invested in upgrading and enhancing arts facilities across the city. The improvements will include new lighting in auditoriums, installing or upgrading dance floors and choral risers, school libraries and instrument repair and distribution. In addition to these larger investments, money will be spent on tools for full-time arts teachers, professional development, expanded student programs, expanded partnerships with arts organizations and borough-based arts teams that will coordinate with school leadership to boost arts programs. “We want every child to feel the spark that comes from learning something they are passionate about. And so often, it’s taking up an instrument, honing an artistic craft, or performing for the first time that helps a young person come into their own for the first time,” de Blasio said. “The investments we are making here won’t just help our students explore music, dance and the arts. They will help these children grow in a way that helps them succeed in school and in life.” Local organizations outside of schools will also see the benefits of the funding. Ellen Kodadek, executive and artistic director of Flushing Town Hall — which provides arts education for nearly 10,000 students every year — expressed her own gratitude for the increased funds. “It's been proven time and again that kids who have early exposure to arts education excel in other subjects,” Kodadek said. “We're thrilled to know that the programming we provide in schools and at Flushing Town Hall will continue to be supported in the coming fiscal year."
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Dawn Scala
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July 10, 2014
• The proposed site is a former manufacturing facility and is adjacent to a chemical manufacturer, Independent Chemical Corp., classified as a Toxic Release Inventory Facility, as well as being in close proximity to Kliegman Brothers, a Hazardous Waste Remediation Site as per the Department of Environmental Conservation. Contaminants from the Kliegman site have been reported in numerous surrounding locations, requiring ongoing remediation, including two groundwater monitoring wells on the proposed shelter site. Has the environmental study on the subject property performed a full scale detailed in depth analysis of the site, considering the fact that contamination is highly likely based on the prior use of the building and the proximity of other "toxic" sites? It appears the answer is NO, as the EAS states "…a limited Phase II Subsurface Investigations was performed at the Project Site in October 2013…" It is unthinkable that a more detailed full scope analysis was not performed. Can you say with certainty and clear conscious that this is a suitable location to house a large concentration of families with children, who have no voice in where they are being placed? • The EAS also states that asbestos-containing materials are present in the building (in the sheetrock, plaster wall and ceilings, vinyl floor tiles and roofing materials, pipe and fitting insulations) and is in good to poor condition, however no remediation is recommended. It further states "…only limited interior renovations" would occur. As a former manufacturing building which has been vacant and allowed to deteriorate for over a decade, I find this statement hard to believe. To convert the site to a residence for 125 families, it would stand to reason that substantial interior renovation would be required, which has the high potential to disturb the asbestos containing materials to the point that asbestos particles/dust would be released at unacceptable levels. • Has AECOM USA, Inc. the provider of the Environmental Assessment Statement (EAS) and Supplemental Studies to the EAS dated June 2014, ever concluded a site is not suitable for placement of a homeless shelter?