Grand marshal prepares for Sunday
by Holly Bieler
May 22, 2015 | 876 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
It’s going to be a hectic next two weeks for Roland Meier, president of the Westside Tennis Club. On May 28, months of work will pay off when the Forest Hills concert series kicks off at the club with English crooner Ed Sheeran slated to perform to sold-out crowds. But first, Meier will preside as grand marshal of the Forest Hills Kiwanis Club and American Legion-organized Memorial Day Parade this Sunday, a position filled by community heavyweights like Borough President Melinda Katz in the past. If Meier still has a bit of time to prepare for the concert series, his mind is now focused on the impending parade, and pressing logistical questions as to the duties of the grand marshal. What kind of hat, for instance, will he be donning? “I’m not wearing my Swiss helmet,” said the Switzerland-born Meier during a visit this week. “Maybe a top hat?” Although he said he nearly fell out of his chair when he heard he had been chosen, for many in the community Meier’s selection as grand marshal was a no-brainer. He quickly rose to prominence within the community when he took the helm of the historic club in January of 2012, and he was instrumental in orchestrating the concert series both this year and last. “We thought he would be an excellent choice,” said Tom Long, commander of the American Legion. Meier said that in all seriousness, the vast amount of preparation for Sunday centered around the speech he will give, in which he wanted to celebrate the heroism of veterans and call attention to the incredible sacrifices they had made for their country. “The sacrifices by the families are unbelievable,” he said. The parade will take place this Sunday at noon along Metropolitan Avenue.,/i>
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Aronowicz, Desio to lead 2015 Maspeth Memorial Day Parade
May 22, 2015 | 559 views | 0 0 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print
William Aronowicz
William Aronowicz
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James Desio
James Desio
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As a patriotic 19 year old, William Aronowicz enlisted in the Marine Air Corps. On December 19, 1941, only 12 days after the Japanese sneak attack on Pearl Harbor, he opted to choose service and not be randomly drafted as was the fate of many of his friends. Born in Jamaica, Queens, to a hard-working middle-class family with a dedicated work ethic, he instinctively knew he wanted to make a contribution. During boot camp at Paris Island, Aronowicz’s was assigned to an observation squadron that was the eyes of the commanders making the decisions as troops invade the Japanese-held Marshall Islands. The squadron would follow the invasion of the island and establish the necessary support to keep the observation planes in the air to prepare for the next island invasion. On February 7, 1944, Staff Sergeant Aronowicz was transported to Majuro Atoll after it fell to American troops. He arrives on the atoll of Kwajalein as the Japanese government surrenders and WWII ends. Many of his fellow marines want to reenlist, including Aronowicz, but Uncle Sam is downsizing. Back in Queens, he returns to woodworking for much of his professional life. At a Mew Year's Eve dance a dear but distant acquaintance, Mary Dudek, sweeps him off his dancing feet and has him marching down the wedding aisle. They marry on October 19, 1946, and are together for 48 years. They were constant partners when they danced at Polish National Hall, and while Aronowicz has been a widower for many years, he continues to dance and won a contest recently at The Kowalinski Post doing The Lindy to “In The Mood” by Glenn Miller. “I have more friends here in good old Maspeth than anywhere I ever live,” says Aronowicz James Desio got his first exposure to Maspeth at the age of six when his parents enrolled him in St. Stanislaus grammar school. Desio was born on Graham Avenue in Greenpoint, but his parents eventually bought a house on Flushing Avenue for them and their nine children. Desio has many pleasant memories of his eight years at St. Stan’s and remembers most of his teaching nuns at school and the priests for whom he served as an altar boy. He vividly recalls one incident where the principal gave him the task of recalling all of the kids on lunch break in the school yard to return back to the classroom. He completely misunderstood the good sister and released the student body and sent them home for the day. Somehow, Desio survives and graduates in 1941. A two-year stint at Queens Vocational High School is the extent of his formal education before he signs on as helper in his father’s trucking company. Soon after, Desio is drafted into the United States Army and basic training begins at Ft. Gordon in Georgia and then it’s on to Naples, Italy, aboard The Wakefield. Desio is in the 88th Infantry attached to the 337th Field Artillery as his unit moves rapidly toward a highly contentious objective: Monte Cassino. The cathedral is located high on a hill, is heavily fortified and serves as an enemy observation post. A decision is made to destroy the edifice with bombs and artillery. The 88th Infantry is dug in close to the objective and receives a good deal of friendly artillery and bombs. Desio loses 100 percent of the hearing in his left ear and his unit takes many casualties in the bombardment. The next day his regiment takes the high ground consisting of the leveled abbey and captures many Germans. The 88th Infantry and other units succeed in capturing the abbey on May 17, 1944, thus ending one of the longest and bloodiest engagements of the Italian Campaign. Desio was near the town of Brenner on May 8, 1945, when Germany formally surrenders. He remembers being at lunch on the “chow” line when word spreads that the war is over. The men in the outfit were more interested in lunch then in celebrating. It was at this time he received notice that he was going stateside because of the Sullivan Provision. Congress passed a law to send siblings out of harm’s way if a member of his family was killed in action. His brother John Desio, his brother was killed during a bombardment on his tank in France earlier that year. The Desio family welcomes James home with open arms. He quickly returns to work at Corrugated Box Co. in Maspeth and remains for 42 years. At his cousins wedding, he is introduced to the love of his life, Anita. They soon marry at her parish, St. Francis DePaola in Brooklyn. Life in Maspeth appeals to the young couple and they have two children, Roseann and Joseph, and are blessed with four grandchildren. Unfortunately, Anita passed away after she and James had 63 wonderful years together. Desio is involved with Don Bosco Knights of Columbus, Frank Kowalinski Post, Maspeth 5 Towns Club and Village Seniors “Maspeth is a beautiful place,” says Desio. “I’m not leaving, it only got better.”
The Maspeth Memorial Day Parade begins at 1 p.m. at Grand and 57th avenues. A ceremony follows at Maspeth Memorial Square, 69th Street & Grand Avenue.
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James Desio
James Desio
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William Aronowicz
William Aronowicz
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Food Industry Labeling: The Nuances of Meeting FDA Standards
by cjleclaire
 Stephen Hans Blog
May 21, 2015 | 1092 views | 0 0 comments | 27 27 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

At the end of November, 2014, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) began requiring restaurants and vending machine companies to label foods for nutritional value. At first glance, this requirement may not seem like a significant legal issue, but in light of a recent investigation, perhaps there is more than meets the eye.

In March, 2015, the FDA issued a warning letter to a New York company called Kind, LLC

The company manufactures healthy snacks, and the FDA warned that the company’s labeling failed to meet FDA labeling requirements for its products: Kind Fruit & Nut Almond & Apricot, Kind Fruit & Nut Almond & Coconut, Kind Plus Peanut Butter Dark Chocolate Protein, and Kind Plus Dark Chocolate Cherry Cashew Antioxidants.
The labeling on these snacks violated the Federal, Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. Some of the words used in advertising the product included “healthy and tasty,” “convenient and wholesome,” “good source of fiber,” “no trans fats” and “very low sodium.” The FDA maintains strict percentage standards for certain nutrients to be called “no trans fats” or “antioxidant rich” and “very low sodium.”

The following was an example of how product labeling was inconsistent with FDA standards. To meet a claim of “healthy,” foods must conform to the standards set forth in 21 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 101.65(d)(2) . “Low saturated fat” is a fat content of one gram or less and with no more than 15 percent of the calories in the food derived from saturated fat. The Kind, LLC products had 3.5 grams of saturated fat, not one gram or less.

This was just one of a number of violations and the warning letter gave Kind, LLC 15 days to respond and explain the actions being taken to correct each of the violations listed.

In the sea of regulations and laws that businesses must comply with today, it is vital to have an employment law attorney to consult with and receive help from with legal issues, whether involving regulatory agencies or employees. The best defense is always preventative in nature.

Stay on top of your business by consulting with an experienced employment defense lawyer. Stephen Hans & Associates has successfully defended and provided legal guidance to employers for more than 20 years.


 

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