Crawlers swarm Grand St. in search of Easter eggs
by Chase Collum
Apr 17, 2014 | 57 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Capturing the spirit of the season, Table Hopping NY teamed up with the Grand Street BID to host an Easter-themed pub crawl through six featured bars. Table Hopping NY Founder Jordan Khammar, who was helping his crew hand out wristbands and collect eggshells from a corner booth at Huckleberry Bar on Saturday, said he reached out to the BID with the idea for an egg hunt/bar crawl after hosting another successful holiday crawl in Brooklyn last year. “We had worked with the Atlantic Avenue BID on a Halloween crawl, and we thought it was a fun idea so we decided to work with another BID because they’re really fun to work with and they know a lot of places in local communities,” Khammar said. “We really try to work with local businesses over chain restaurants.” Participating bars included Burnside, Williams & Bailey, Dar 525, Huckleberry Bar, Bushwick Country Club and LP ‘N Harmony. Distributed among the bars were 100 Easter eggs with a variety of treats inside. “Some of them have candy, but we also have eggs with giveaways at the bar with gift cards, free drinks, and food and things like that at each one of the participating bars,” said Lies’l Hill, a Table Hopping NY rep. Natalia Paez, who commuted to the event from the East Village, was one of many who crossed borough lines to partake in the crawl. “I got an email from Table Hopping – I’m not even sure how I got signed up for their email – but I was scrolling through and I saw an Easter egg hunt, and thought it seemed interesting, something different,” Paez said. “We found some eggs, but unfortunately no free drinks yet.” Manhattanite Corinne Fish was joined by several college and high school friends from around the city. “We’ve gotten chocolate,” Fish said, “and it’s fun to go check out the bars in the neighborhood.” Khammar said Table Hopping NY’s next Brooklyn event will be a collaboration with the Bronx Baking Company at Smorgasburg, where they will be giving away free pretzels through a promo code for every person who signs up for the Table Hopping app.
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Stop & Shop donates kosher food for Passover
by Andrew Shilling
Apr 17, 2014 | 59 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Borough President Melinda Katz joins a number of elected officials, members of  JCC, community activists and others at the Stop & Shop in Forest Hills last week.
Borough President Melinda Katz joins a number of elected officials, members of JCC, community activists and others at the Stop & Shop in Forest Hills last week.
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Queens JCC president Warren Hecht.
Queens JCC president Warren Hecht.
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Stop & Shop’s Arlene Putterman hands out candy to Yoav Babakhonv’s children.
Stop & Shop’s Arlene Putterman hands out candy to Yoav Babakhonv’s children.
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Food pantries operated by the Queens Jewish Community Council (JCC) have seen a rise in dependent families, and have reported limited supplies in the last several years as a result. In response to a nearly 5 percent spike in Jewish poverty since 2004, up to nearly 19 percent of the city's Jewish population, Stop & Shop in Forest Hills announced it would donate 1,000 pounds of kosher food to JCC to feed numerous families in need. Arlene Putterman, manager of Public and Community Relations for Stop & Shop’s New York Metro division, announced the donation last week alongside numerous rabbis and local elected officials at the store, located at 89-89 Union Turnpike. “Unfortunately for many, this Passover will be a very difficult holiday,” Putterman said. “The economy has claimed many jobs and many families are in need of help.” Following JCC reports that one in five Jewish households live below the poverty level, Stop & Shop once again put together a care package for the organization, including matzo, gefilte fish, canned tuna, coffee and Passover cookies. “We hope this will make a difference for Passover in the community,” she said. “We hope those who receive this will be able to enjoy their holiday so they can have a ‘zissen Pesach,’ a sweet and happy Passover.” Borough President Melinda Katz and dozens of local City Council members attended the event. Katz said there is only so much the city can do without help from local civic groups during the holiday season. “Government officials can only do so much, and whether the budget is good or at a deficit, we all rely on organizations like the Queens JCC that we know are going to be out there gathering food for folks and taking care of people who simply need an extra hand,” said Katz. Yoav Babakhonv said he would not be able to feed his family of seven children this Passover without the help of Stop & Shop and JCC. “Thank you for being the cause of so much help for all these people who could use it, and there are plenty in Queens,” he said. “It is a merit to the community, to all of Queens and to all of mankind.” JCC president Warren Hecht said the group's pantry has been handing out food from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. leading up to the holiday, and have since run out of food. “We gave out that food and now everything is gone,” Hecht said. “A lot of people talk about what they want to do with the poverty every year, but Stop & Shop doesn’t just do the talk, they do the walk.”
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CB5 supports rezoning application for Ridgewood development
by Andrew Shilling
Apr 17, 2014 | 83 views | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Ted Renz speaks out in opposition to the land use committee reccomendation
Ted Renz speaks out in opposition to the land use committee reccomendation
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CB5 member Kathy Masi and others weigh in on the rezoning proposal
CB5 member Kathy Masi and others weigh in on the rezoning proposal
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CB5 district manager Gary Giordano, chair Vincent Arcuri and Land Use Committee chair Walter Sanchez.
CB5 district manager Gary Giordano, chair Vincent Arcuri and Land Use Committee chair Walter Sanchez.
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Community Board 5 voted 28 to 11 in support of a zoning change that would pave the way for a four-story luxury rental development at 176 Woodward Avenue in Ridgewood last week. Following an impassioned exchange from residents and a minority report presentation from the CB5 Land Use Committee, the board voted in favor of the required variance proposal. With hopes that the vote would provide developers the approval to move ahead with their 138-unit, $18 million plans, Starr Street resident Dan Russo said the new commercial and residential mixed-use space would ultimately change the community for the better. “If this doesn’t go through, that means it’s going to go back to the trucks with the exhaust, and the condoms in the mornings from the prostitution,” Russo said. “I really just wish it would go through, just for the neighborhood, for the kids.” CB5 Land Use Committee chair Walter Sanchez said there was “overwhelming support” from the neighbors for the project at their last committee meeting, and suggested the board move to do the same. With the proposed community space and commercial components, Sanchez added that the committee nearly voted unanimously in favor of the proposal. Land-use committee members Paul Kerzner and Theodore Renz, also members of the Ridgewood Local Development Corporation, were the sole votes against the rezoning that would eliminate manufacturing space for rental apartments, and presented an alternative plan that would incorporate the two. In an effort to keep manufacturing on site, Kerzner and Renz proposed a Special Mixed Use District (MX) designation, a plan that would require the developers to sell their apartment spaces and keep two floors for a manufacturer who they said has already agreed to move a portion of their business to the site. “We all have to agree that nobody likes what’s happening there now,” Kerzner said. “By doing so we will be bringing back to this location 250 jobs, where right now that spot is maybe providing two jobs.” Councilman Antonio Reynoso said the average median annual income in his district of Ridgewood is nearly $41,000 (50 percent of the average median income (AMI), and that the average rent for a two-bedroom should be no more than $1,025 per month. However, studio apartments are currently listed from $1,000 to $1,200 per month, one-bedrooms at $1,400 to $1,800 and two-bedroom apartments at $2,000 per month. “For the families that are in need of housing, the AMI is not necessarily met by this project,” Reynoso said. “So even though we might not need extremely affordable housing, we can talk about moderate and middle-income housing, or other AMI’s that might be appropriate.” The newly elected councilman added that while work in the past has been mainly focused on creating an affordable living environment, he alluded to finding new ways of doing business when it comes to seeking housing agreements. “This is going to be the first rezoning that happens under my watch - and not this project necessarily, but developments in the City of New York - we have been extremely narrow-minded and limited as to how we should be doing these projects so that we can maximize the benefit for the community,” Reynoso said. “That means many things, and not just affordable housing.”
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just Do It DOT
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April 17, 2014
Still no one mentions the safety of the kids attending IS 73 !!!! This is the real reason for the requested change. It's all about me...I will have to go around the block, I will lose more of my time, I will have to go down the hill.....me me me. Grow up and think about the safety of those kids crossing each corner on their way to school. Grow up and think about property damage that people have endured. Grow up or be prepared for major damage to your water main and sewer.