Habitat NYC breaks ground on Ocean Hill project
by Chase Collum
Sep 28, 2014 | 5741 views | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend | print
With the support of the Department of Housing Preservation and Development (HPD) and several other government agencies, Habitat for Humanity NYC broke ground on a new 15-unit apartment complex at 2398 Dean Street in Ocean Hill last week. The project is aimed at adding to the affordable housing stock in the Brownsville area, and was made possible in part by funding from HPD, state Housing Trust Fund and the Brooklyn borough president's office. “Habitat for Humanity's creation of 15 low-income homeownership opportunities in the Ocean Hill/Brownsville neighborhood is a great example of our commitment to fostering diverse and affordable communities,” said HPD Commissioner Vicki Been. Community Board 16 chair Bettie Kollock-Wallace was among those to help break ground at the ceremony. “I applaud New York City Habitat for Humanity and partners for the investment in our communities,” Kollock-Wallace said. “We are confident it will be another jewel in [Habitat's] crown.” According to construction manager Tara Duvivier, permits were pulled earlier in the week on the complex, which will consist of 15 two-bedroom, below-market units in a series of four-story buildings at the intersection of Dean Street and Mother Gaston Boulevard. The project will be led by Lo Magno Construction, which has worked with Habitat in the past, though much of the work will be completed by volunteers. Duvivier said construction should take about 18 months. Neil Hetherington, CEO of Habitat for Humanity NYC, believes that by providing “simple, decent, affordable homes,” his organization can, at least for some, break the cycle of poverty. “Habitat for Humanity is pleased to play an ever-increasing role in creating homeownership opportunities,” he said. “This development is aligned with Mayor de Blasio's plan to build and preserve 200,000 units of affordable housing and we will continue to do our part in ensuring safe, decent and affordable housing for every New Yorker.” One of the ways they do this is by requiring the future owners to put in at least 250 hours of “sweat equity” on the projects. “Rather than charity,” said Hetherington, “we give people an opportunity to have a stake in their community.”
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Knowing the truth
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September 26, 2014
Does any paper do any research or fact check? Welcome to Whitestone is NOT a 501c3 charitable organization Devon OConnor solicited money for that sign from local businesses as well as youth groups. He made promises, took their money, and didn't deliver. Ask DG LITTLE LEAGUE AS WELL AS AUBURNDALE TO NAME A FEW.
Brooklyn Bridge Park turns construction equipment into art
by Jess Berry
Sep 26, 2014 | 215 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Shipping containers can house any number of things, but an art show is not typically one of them. That is, of course, unless you are in Brooklyn. Thousands of visitors have already flocked to Brooklyn Bridge Park’s Pier 5 to check out the third annual Photoville — a photographic village with exhibits constructed out of shipping containers. The containers blend in perfectly with the tons of other construction equipment currently filling the developing Brooklyn Bridge Park, but for once, the equipment is actually appealing to look at. This year, the pop-up modular exhibit features photographic works from around the world in over 60 shipping containers. Exhibits include photos ranging from TIME Magazine, The New York Times and National Geographic Magazine to Chris Bartlett’s humanizing portraits of Iraqi detainees. Visitors can wander the huge outdoor showcase — taking up a full 74,000 square feet in the park — walking in and out of shipping containers, each with their own theme, design and artwork. In addition to the photo showcases, Photoville boasts artist lectures, professional development seminars, hands-on workshops, nighttime multimedia projection from online news platform Narratively and a summer beer garden with food vendors hosted by Smorgasburg. Jeremy Rossen, who works in Red Hook and lives in Crown Heights, headed to the pier last week to check out the exhibit after his friend, a photographer herself, told him about it. “I think it’s great,” Rossen said of the exhibit. “I mean, I’d much rather see art in this kind of context than in a white wall gallery. There it kind of loses its meaning in a lot of ways, for me.” The exhibit opened on Sept. 18 and will run until Sept. 28. On weekdays, attendees can check out the artwork from 4 p.m. to 10 p.m. and on weekends from noon to 10 p.m.
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Festival highlights the cuisine of Jackson Heights
by Andrew Shilling
Sep 25, 2014 | 483 views | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Viva La Comida
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Jackson Heights native Elisa Lopez, 25, was just one of hundreds that gathered to try some of the street food on display at the third annual Viva la Comida Festival. Lopez and her friends waited on the winding line for nearly 30-minutes to get a taste of the legendary dishes offered at the Arepa Lady food truck. “We were just talking about how neat it is to support her since she just opened up her own restaurant,” Lopez said. “Arepas are something I grew up with, so seeing it rise to this level of popularity is a point of a lot of pride.” Although the 7-train was running on a limited schedule, hindering what could have been an even larger turnout for the festival, Lopez said she was nevertheless excited to see the turnout at 82nd Street and Roosevelt Avenue. “It’s just a great time to support the vendors, come together for music,” Lopez said. “I’ve already bumped into high school, college friends and elementary school friends.” Jeff Orlick, curator of the festival, said there would have been more food trucks this year, but he had a hard time getting local vendors to leave their spot since many of them have such a die-hard following in the community. “They’re very loyal,” Orlick explained. “And that’s the idea of this; these are vendors that don’t typically move out of their home locations. For them it’s a leap of faith, but for us, it’s very exciting.” Part of the success was in part thanks to $5,000 in funding from local Councilman Daniel Dromm. “One of the things that I want to do is to promote this hip neighborhood as a destination for people to come to,” Dromm said. “We’ve got a lot to offer here and I think this is one of the things that people should know about.” 82nd Street Partnership director Seth Taylor celebrated his final week with the business improvement district. He will be heading the NoHo Business Improvement in Manhattan. “We’re trying to harness the diversity of the neighborhood and bring it all together in this festival, “ Taylor said. “We have Colombian, Ecuadorian, Chinese, Nepalese; it’s all here right on 82nd Street, so it’s a great one-stop-shop for everyone to come out and sample the best.”
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