Three down, still many to go
Dec 07, 2016 | 19 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
We sifted through our archives and found this mystery photo that we ran last week asking for help identifying some of the people or even the event. Obviously, it's a groundbreaking and at the heart of it all is former Queens borough president Donald Manes, one of the most tragic figures in recent New York City political history. More specifically, it appears to be a groundbreaking on Myrtle Avenue with members of the Myrtle Avenue Local Development Corporation, which we presume might have been a precursor to the Myrtle Avenue Business Improvement District. After that, we didn't have much more information to offer. Well, Jeff Gottlieb, president of the Central Queens Historical Society, emailed us with the names of some of the other folks picture with Manes. He wrote that standing to the left of Manes if former city comptroller Harrison J. Goldin. Goldin was a native of the Bronx who served in the post from 1974 to 1989, when he quit to run for mayor in the Democratic Primary, eventually losing to David Dinkins. Prior to that, he served in the State Senate from 1966 to 1973, and also held a post in the U.S. Department of Justice's Office of Civil Rights during the Kennedy Administration. To the right of of Manes is former assemblyman Cliff Wilson, who served from 1977 to 1984. That western Queens seat has been held since 1985 by Catherine Nolan. Gottlieb also identified the tall white-haired gentlemen with the dour expression on the far right of the photo as former state senator Martin Knorr. The Ridgewood resident held the post from 1969 to 1988. Prior to that, he served in the Assembly for two years beginning in 1953. His post would later be held by Serphin Maltese for a number of years, but now belongs to State Senator Joseph Addabbo. Knorr passed away in 1989. Well, that clears some of the mystery up, but there's still a lot of unidentified faces in this photo. If you think you can put some names to them, email us at polposition@queensledger.com.
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Flushing Chamber convenes panel to promote good business practices
Dec 07, 2016 | 53 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
The Greater Flushing Chamber of Commerce last week launched a “blue ribbon panel” to develop a strategy for raising standards in the local business community. The panel will advise the chamber on developing principles and mechanisms to help guide the future conduct of the Flushing business community. “The vast majority of business owners in our neighborhood work hard to run their businesses according to rules and serve their customers with integrity,” said panel chair Simon Gerson, President of the Greater Flushing Chamber of Commerce. “We want to show that the business community is an important part of our social fabric and that we are committed to making Flushing a better place for everyone.” By launching a dialogue on business standards, the chamber hopes to proactively engage and change the behavior of the business community on a number of important issues, including quality of products and services, how customers are treated, worker rights, and corporate responsibility to the surrounding community and environment. At the panel's first meeting at Flushing Town Hall, community leaders and business owners spoke out about the need to raise business standards. “We should not wait for the next business scandal to happen before taking action, but find ways to educate our business community and work with government to increase compliance with existing laws,” said chamber executive director John Choe. “And if those laws no longer make sense, work with our elected officials to change them.” Lourdes Villanueva Hartrick from Douglas Elliman Real Estate and Carol Lee Whiting from the Concerned African-Americans of Flushing both expressed concerns about the lack of English language signage and difficulties communicating with store managers and workers in Flushing. The chamber is working with Monroe College and the Queens Library to promote English language programs for the business community, as well as at new sites like the greenmarket at Maple Playground. The chamber is also developing marketing programs to address the issue of storefront signage and cross-cultural communication in Flushing. “The next step is to figure out how to enable small businesses to implement these ideas and put these principles in action,” said Mike Wang of Politan Real Estate. “In Flushing, there is a lack of best practices and business models that create an incentive for prioritizing the customer experience, especially in a competitive environment where cost-cutting is the norm.” Other ideas that came out of the panel's first meeting include developing policies and protocols for small business owners who want to be inclusive, creating a manual and training program on how managers and workers can treat customers with dignity and respect, and creating more resources for businesses interested in hiring English-speaking workers. “The chamber has already developed a member decal to identify which businesses in our community have the highest standards,” said Choe. “We will be using these decals and other marketing tools to heavily promote the best in our business community and asking local residents and customers to support these businesses as well.”
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