Brooklyn t-shirt company puts spin on traditional athletic gear
by Jess Berry
Nov 20, 2014 | 443 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Walk into a Sports Authority or Dick’s Sporting Goods and you will see lines of the same t-shirts lining the walls, neon in color and plastered with motivational phrases like the classic “Just Do It.” But two Brooklyn women got tired of the status quo and decided to create a clothing line that speaks to a different kind of athlete. “I’m a runner, because I don’t want to look like a meatball,” reads one of the designs created by the new, Brooklyn-based athletic wear company Whiptail Athletic. The idea behind Whiptail is simple, explained co-founder Jaimee Nelsen. “Let’s be honest, why do half of us work out?” Nelsen asked. “To look good naked. It’s just having fun with that, and that’s okay. It’s just a matter of not taking yourself so seriously.” Whiptail is all about not taking itself too seriously, with t-shirts slapped with silly phrases and images, ranging from triceratops doing tire flips to Vikings working out on an erging machine. “I’ve always kind of seen it as social commentary on current workout culture,” Nelsen said. “It’s trying to mix the geek and athlete together. It’s for individuals who are just kind of individuals.” As athletes themselves, Nelsen and her partner Sarah Litt are well aware of the needs specific to athletic clothing. The t-shirts are made to be soft and smell-resistant, Nelsen explained, so that “you can work out in it if you wanted to, but you can also wear them out.” And, she said, Whiptail will ideally not be stopping at t-shirts. Nelsen and Litt have both played rugby with New York Rugby Club for many years, a sport that is well-known for players with body shapes and sizes that run the gamut. “I think my ultimate pipe dream is to do some athletic clothes that fit athletes that aren’t pink or purple,” Nelsen said. “Just functional things. Like spandex that actually fit you, or women’s shorts, but if you have a booty you can still fit in them.” Whiptail will have its launch party this Friday night at the Brooklyn Pub, with first come first serve free beer and t-shirts for sale starting at 6 p.m. All are invited and will have a chance to meet the Whiptail co-founders and learn more about the company. For more information on the company and to see the t-shirt designs, check out their website.
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Family and friends remember longtime sanitation worker Steven Frosch
by Andrew Shilling
Nov 19, 2014 | 466 views | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Remembering Steven Frosch
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The family of longtime Queens sanitation worker Steven Frosch, who died in a work-related accident at the Queens West 5A Broom Garage back in June, were honored today by the NYC Department of Sanitation (DSNY). Surrounded by his former coworkers, supervisors and local elected officials, Frosch’s family and friends looked on as Commissioner Kathryn Garcia and others unveiled a plaque and shrine, naming the garage in his honor. Jason Vazquez, Frosch’s immediate supervisor at the garage, located at 58-02 48th St. in Maspeth, said he will always remember his longtime coworker as, “one of the best workers that the department ever had.” “He was one of these guys that when you meet him, in five minutes you’re always going to feel more positive than you were before,” Vazquez said. “He was always a positive influence and helped me continue on in my path.” Vazquez also worked with Frosch when he was at his former post in Forest Hills. “The people there loved him and as a supervisor out there, he didn’t need to be supervised,” he said. “He always did his job 100 percent perfect.” Frosch died on scene when he was struck and pinned by a mechanical broom while repairing his “street cleaner” in the Maspeth garage. Commissioner Garcia said she has remained close with the family ever since the accident, adding that it has been her mission to create a safer department ever since. “There is a real focus now on safety in all aspects of our operations, not just what you would think as being the more dangerous portions of the job,” Garcia said. “Also, I think there has been a real support for one another during this particular time of mourning.” While she said they have placed more of a focus on creating a safer work environment for their employees, Garcia noted that the job is a dangerous work place and that workers must “remain focused at all times.” Last summer Garcia said DSNY put their workers through defensive driving classes as part of Mayor Bill de Blasio’s Vision Zero initiative. “He was a great guy, he was a fabulous employee and he left behind a family of four small children,” she said. State Assemblyman and former member of DSNY Michael DenDekker said while he never met Frosch on the job, they both worked at the same garage together and he remembers his name. “When people turn around and say, ‘what do you do for a living,’ it kind of identifies you when you say ‘a sanitation worker,’” DenDekker said. “That’s not who Steven was. He was a husband, a father, a brother, a family person.”
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Remembering Steven Frosch
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m.Bonano
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November 19, 2014
Wow, within 1/2 hour of just driving around the block I seen two people urinating in public, throwing trash in the streets and peoples yards and smoking weed online and down the block.
Knockdown Center (Photo by Ariana Page Russell)
Knockdown Center (Photo by Ariana Page Russell)
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