elizasdan767
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October 21, 2017
First weeks were good. Much more fun will start this week, few teams less :) However, I watched preseason games with ScreenVariety Tv and I think they have the best option to watch regular season games too.
The Moon Priestess
by Nancy A. Ruhling
Oct 20, 2017 | 837 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Sylvia, a holistic spiritual healer, has bachelor’s and master’s degrees from CUNY.
Sylvia, a holistic spiritual healer, has bachelor’s and master’s degrees from CUNY.
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Sylvia doing a tree pose by a tree.
Sylvia doing a tree pose by a tree.
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She hopes to open a retreat upstate.
She hopes to open a retreat upstate.
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Sylvia-Anais Mouzourou brings out a box of dates and places them on her office desk. Would you like a cup of iced coffee? Or how about a glass of water? Feeding visitors, she says, is a Greek thing. Sylvia is, among other things, a Moon Priestess, and, the food aside, she tends to focus more on the spiritual than the physical side of life. She is from Limassol, Cyprus’ City of the Sun, which is where her training as a healer and psychoanalyst began and where most of her family remains. Sylvia, who has a dainty diamond stud in her nose and a thick black braid down her back, grew up loving dancing, painting, poetry and visiting museums. She always figured she would make her career in the arts. Her grandfather was an engineer for the U.S. Embassy in Cyprus, so she attended Limassol’s American schools, where she learned English early on. As a student at Intercollege, she started out studying art history. When she was offered the chance to study in Athens or Indianapolis for a semester, she didn’t hesitate to head to Indiana. “I felt Cyprus was too small,” she says. “I wanted to expand and get to know the world.” Although she’s always been interested in spirituality, her path to the healing profession began via a conventional route. After her semester in Indiana ended, she moved to Astoria to continue her studies at Queens College, where she earned a bachelor’s degree in psychology and sociology. She also started studying chakra energy healing. She got a job as an intake coordinator at Goodwill Industries in Astoria and eventually earned a master’s in counseling psychology from Brooklyn College. For a while, she worked as a clinical psychotherapist, seeing children as well as adults. “I took a year off to study yoga and meditation, which I had started when I was 17, which was a year before I came to America,” she says. “Then I went to an energy healing school. It was a big turn in my life.” It was around that time that she became a Moon Priestess. “I’m a medium between the sacred and the profane,” she says. “I mediate between the physical temple and the spiritual temple.” As a priestess, she communes with the Earth, rooting herself with Mother Nature. “As part of that process, I dedicate time every day to meditation,” she says. “I call myself back from the energy of people and demands of the city. I ask myself how I feel and what I need.” Despite all her training, she wasn’t sure what she was going to do with her life. She needn’t have worried. “During one of my meditations, I got the idea to open a yoga studio,” she says. “I wanted to create a space where my talents could come out.” Two days later, she found the perfect place. The Athena Yoga & Healing Arts Center opened on 45th Street at 34th Avenue in Astoria in 2012. After it closed, early this year, Sylvia “felt like a mother losing her baby.” Since then, she has opened her own private practice, The Guided Healing, where she uses her skills – hands-on healing, sound healing, intuitive teaching, Tarot and Rune card readings, yoga therapy, meditation, family constellations, aromatherapy and a variety of workshops – to restore balance to people’s lives. “I hear the story of each person, and I treat them with whatever tools will open them up,” she says. When she’s not meditating or healing people, Sylvia likes to cook (she’s a vegan), dance, travel, take photos and write. “I’m working on a book describing the magical experiences in healing that I have had,” she says. She’s also getting ready to open a retreat upstate. “It will be a temple where people come to heal,” she says. “It will be like a country home where you can pitch a tent in the yard or rent a room.” She doesn’t know when or how this will happen. But she’s sure it will come. She will meditate and manifest it. Nancy A. Ruhling may be reached at nruhling@gmail.com. Follow her on Twitter at @nancyruhling and visit astoriacharacters.com.
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William Kregler challenging Katz for borough president
by Jennifer Khedaroo
Oct 20, 2017 | 412 views | 0 0 comments | 13 13 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Ask William Kregler if he is running for Queens borough president this November, and he’ll tell you he’s “not running, but actually walking straight into office.” Confidence beamed from the Republican candidate when he declared he would be a voice for the working-class population in the borough. In a wide-ranging interview last week, the Woodside resident explained that his “battle” isn’t necessarily with Melinda Katz, but rather the conditions in Queens that have changed over recent years and need addressed.. Kregler, a former public housing officer in Brooklyn, said that experience taught him that in order to gain respect from the community, you need to give respect. “One thing that I learned as a housing officer is that it was true community policing,” Kregler said. “You have to be the guy that’s going to be there every single day, the lone ranger out there, so if you want to be professional and respected, you couldn’t be ‘badge happy.’” Kregler also served as a firefighter and fire marshal, and is currently the president of the Fire Marshals Benevolent Association. Stemming from his professional life, Kregler said he is focused on taking on a watchdog role as borough president. “If I see that there’s something good for the community, I will be the messenger boy, but if something is adversely affecting the community, I’m going to put the monkey wrench in it,” he said. “That’s what I’m good at. It’s what a borough president should do.” Kregler is passionate about a number of issues, including bike lanes, community board representation and homelessness in the borough. He argued that the addition of bike lanes along Queens Boulevard, from Woodside to Rego Park, has negatively impacted traffic, causing congestion for vehicles traveling on the major thoroughfare. Kregler added that that business community has also been affected because customers no longer have space to park. “I’m not against bike lanes, but you can’t take away car lanes to accommodate bike lanes,” he said. “Queens Boulevard is wide enough to accommodate both bicycles and vehicles without impeding on either.” To do this, he suggested getting rid of trees on the medians. For those who may push back on the idea of losing green space, he argued that with substantial “warehouse-like” development on both sides of Queens Boulevard, it has already lost its reputation as a community roadway. “Everything is being knocked down, we don’t have the mom-and-pop stores,” he said. “Everything is going to be a warehouse. You’re going to live in a warehouse, go to the movies in a warehouse, go eat in the warehouse. It’s terrible.” As borough president, Kregler would aim to give more respect to community boards, whose members are appointed by the borough president “I want to put people who represent their neighbors, not Bill Kregler,” he said. “The community boards are going to live with any decision they make, but once they make a decision, you have to honor it. “It’s a volunteer position, the community boards are not getting paid for their work, so give them a little respect,” he added. To tackle homelessness in Queens, Kregler wants the city to stop using hotels as shelters. He pointed to several hotels along Queens Boulevard, including a Holiday Inn Express that is being built near FDNY Engine 292 on 68th Street, which could potentially become homeless shelter sites. And though the mayor has stated that the homeless will stop being housed in hotels by 2023, Kregler doesn’t believe the administration’s promise. “The mayor says he’s getting out of the business, but to hell he is,” Kregler said. “They’re building hotels for that purpose on Queens Boulevard.” Instead of using money for emergency hotel rooms and bureaucracy, Kregler suggested more programs that catered to the needs of the homeless population, such as mental health services. As a native of Springfield Gardens, Kregler has seen firsthand the neglect of southeast Queens. To provide high-quality jobs, he suggested tech companies looking for “social urban enhancements,” such as Amazon, come to the area and utilize the available land. “Nothing has changed in southeast Queens, it’s a world that time has forgotten,” Kregler said. “You want to find hidden figures of talented, hardworking people, just give them the opportunity. “If I could do one thing, whether my candidacy is successful or not, I would want to bring attention to southeast Queens,” he added. He is proud to represent the Republican and Conservatives parties, calling them “good, core-valued people.” But Kregler doesn’t want his political affiliation to hinder non-Republicans voting for him. “Don’t try to put me with Midwestern Republicans, I’m a New York City Republican,” said Kregler. “We don’t have to like each other, but we can work together and respect one another.”
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