Remembering the "other voice" from Hoboken.
by Tiziano Dossena
Sep 08, 2011 | 1245 views | 3 3 comments | 26 26 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Jimmy Roseeli receiving the Lifetime Achievement Award from the editors of L'Idea Magazine in 1998. From the left, LindaAnn Loschiavo, the author tiziano thomas Dossena, Jimmy Roselli and the Editor-in Chief of L'Idea Magazine Leonardo Campanile
Jimmy Roseeli receiving the Lifetime Achievement Award from the editors of L'Idea Magazine in 1998. From the left, LindaAnn Loschiavo, the author tiziano thomas Dossena, Jimmy Roselli and the Editor-in Chief of L'Idea Magazine Leonardo Campanile
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Jimmy Roselli, the “other” voice from Hoboken has left us, forever. His “pure singing voice’, as the Press of Atlantic City defined it, will now be heard only through his recordings. The singer who had outperformed Pavarotti in ticket sales in Atlantic City and “stood up to shakedown artists”, the man who successfully introduced the Neapolitan songs to America, the archenemy of Frank Sinatra, is no more. He has left a legacy which I hope will not be forgotten, the love for his family’s native language, Italian.

Some of our young readers may ask: “Jimmy who?” People from the older generations, though, specially around the tri-state area, have not forgotten him an still hold a special place in their heart for this controversial singer who spurned Sinatra and the low level mobsters but thrived in the company of more famous one (illustrious and controversial his solo performance at the wedding of John Gotti Jr. and his loyal following of various heavies of the underworld at his concerts).

Long Islanders, whether they came from Brooklyn, Queens or Massapequa, attended in hordes the Italian Catskills in the 60’s 70’s and 80’s. Only during the nineties the number of vacationers started to abandon the various “Italian” resorts for other locations outside of the country. In those “amazing years” the outings of Italian Americans and Italophiles were mainly aimed at those resorts because it was there that they could find a link to their roots through exposure to Italian music, games of bocce and interaction with other Italian Americans. I recollect working as a social director at a resort named Villaggio Italia, in Haines Falls, few miles from Hunter Mountain. Roselli’s song Mala Femmena, of which he purportedly sold more than 5 million copies, was the most requested, both for his musical value and the emotion that it would stir in the audience. I knew the song was not originally his and was made famous in Italy by its composer, Totò, but everyone who would ask for the song would unfailingly refer to Roselli, because he was the one who heralded it in the USA.

Notwithstanding Roselli’s perfect Neapolitan diction and marvelous voice, his panache made it the national hymn of Italian Americans and the favorite Italian song in the Saloons and night clubs of America and the most known Italian song, aside from Volare.

I also remember meeting Jimmy Roselli in the occasion of the presentation of a “Lifetime Achievement Award” by L’Idea Magazine, the Quarterly of which I have been editorial Director for over 20 years. At the time I noted his dazzling persona and the authenticity of his expressions, which did not seem to take in account neither the venue nor the public present. He had to say what he had to say, regardless. That made him very different from all the big time entertainers I had met before. He never hid his lowly origins or his bluntness, but he was a great singer and he knew it. He did not want to be considered anything but that…

That is what we’ll remember him for: a great singer who brought fame to the Neapolitan songs in the USA.

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Dennis DelleFave
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December 03, 2011
Great article. For those of you who will be in Florida for the winter, we are having a concert " A Tribute to Jimmy Roselli, The Legend." It will be Feb. 19th 2012 in the Coral Springs Center for the Arts, Coral Springs Fl. I will be telling the story of his life with music , photo's and DVD's of never before seen videos of Jimmy in Concert. Before Pavarotti, before Bocelli, there was Roselli.
David Elliot
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September 18, 2011
Does anyone know if there is a Jimmy Roselli Fan Claub or Appreciation Society?
Tiziano Dossena
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December 05, 2011
Yes, there is. Check his web site (www.jimmyroselli.com)