Dutch Kills community calls for traffic-calming measures
by Andrew Pavia
Jul 24, 2013 | 254 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Dominic Stiller, president of the Dutch Kills Civic Association.
Dominic Stiller, president of the Dutch Kills Civic Association.
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State Senator Michael Gianaris calling for traffic-calming measures in Dutch Kills.
State Senator Michael Gianaris calling for traffic-calming measures in Dutch Kills.
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Local officials and community members rallied last week demanding that the Department of Transportation (DOT) implement traffic-safety improvements for a dangerous intersection in Dutch Kills.

While a number of initiatives, such as speed bumps, adding curb extensions and stop signs are being suggested by those who attended the rally said that they just want the area to be safer.

In roughly a four-block area near the intersection of 39th Avenue and 29th Street there have been at least six vehicular accidents in the past few months.

“Anyone who lives and works in this neighborhood knows that these streets are filled with cars that are speeding and not paying attention to traffic regulations,” said State Senator Michael Gianaris.

DOT did perform a study recently and determined that there was no need to make any traffic calming measures in the neighborhood. But the agency recently met with Gianaris, and has agreed to look into the area regarding possible changes that need to be made.

“There are so many new tools that the DOT could implement,” said Dominic Stiller, president of the Dutch Kills Civic Association.

He and his wife Jean Cawley created an online petition calling for DOT to make changes to the area. Of particular concern is that some of the accidents occurred less than a block away from the Growing Up Green Charter School.

“I walk my daughter to day care just four blocks away, and everyday I have to deal with cars that don’t stop,” said Cawley.

Joan Kehoe, who as lived in the neighborhood for 70 years, was struck by a car that jumped the curb at the problem intersection in 2011. She still is not walking properly.

“There are always accidents,” Joan Kehoe said. “Sometimes you don’t even bother to come out anymore because you already know what it is.”

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