Harrison plays spoiler on ‘Charlo Day’ in Brooklyn
by Bryan Fonseca
Jan 03, 2019 | 1267 views | 0 0 comments | 118 118 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Of the two fighters named "Charlo" on the card at Barclays Center, only Jermall (pictured) would claim victory. (Photo: Leo Wilson/PRC)
Of the two fighters named "Charlo" on the card at Barclays Center, only Jermall (pictured) would claim victory. (Photo: Leo Wilson/PRC)
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Jermell Charlo tries to land a punch during his defeat to Tony Harrison at Barclays 
Center on Saturday night. (Photo: Leo Wilson/Premier Boxing Champions)
Jermell Charlo tries to land a punch during his defeat to Tony Harrison at Barclays Center on Saturday night. (Photo: Leo Wilson/Premier Boxing Champions)
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Tony Harrison with the title belt draped over his shoulder. (Photo: Leo Wilson/PRC)
Tony Harrison with the title belt draped over his shoulder. (Photo: Leo Wilson/PRC)
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A pissed off Jermell Charlo (31-1, 15 KOs) was seated to the left of his victorious twin brother Jermall (28-0, 21 KOs) in the post-fight press conference.

The stage was tailored made for the two to walk through their opponents with little regard and end the night as world champions in a showcase televised nationally on Fox Sports.

Jermell had lost his end of the proceedings, a narrow and controversial unanimous decision to Tony Harrison (28-2, 21 KOs) for his WBC Super welterweight championship, while Jermall was on the fortunate end of a debatable tally, outpointing Mat Korobov (28-2, 14 KOs) and retaining his WBC Interim Middleweight title.

“The judges, they have their own way of thinking,” Jermell said out right. “We see what’s going on. I felt like I won that fight. I pulled out way more rounds than he did, but like I said, it’ll be a rematch.”

As Jermell continued his reserved, calculated tirade, Jermall blankly stared forward with his elbow on the table, fist clenched, pressing onto the area below his right eye, considerably less swollen than the one of his left.

“I’m hard on myself right now,” Jermell continued, his voice cracking, his speech changing. He paused to control himself, looked toward the ground and placed both hands on his head.

Jermall turned to Jermell, consoling his brother without hesitation in front of the media and their entourage.

“It is what it is, bro,” he said calmly as Jermell rubbed his eyes. “Stay up, man.”

“I ain’t a loser, you know what I mean,” Jermell said, his head now up, rubbing his eyes as a tear could be seen through the bottom of his sunglasses.

“I don’t take losses easy,” Jermell added. “I don’t even play video games, because I don’t like losing.”

The response? Three awkward laughs from select media members. The rest of the room remained silent.

It was the tenor of the overall address. Harrison’s decision, a shocking one, especially given boxing’s storied history of favoring the A-side, and the challenger’s slickness, which rarely offers the B-side the benefit, specifically when the challenger had been barely mentioned in any pre-fight hype.

It was all about the Charlos.

Even in the main event, which was determined by a coin flip between the two twins, Jermall’s victory over Korobov was also met with resistance not because he won, but because of the scores.

Jermall defeated Korobov by scores of 119-108 and two of 116-112 though the bout appeared far closer, with some even believing Korobov had a case for being the winner.

In Harrison’s victory, the judges favored him 116-112 and 115-113 twice.

Jermell landed more punches than Harrison, 160-128, including 108-71 in power shots. But at 34 percent of blows landed, Harrison was five-percent more accurate and landed 30 percent of his jabs – 57 total – to Jermell’s 16 percent and 52 total.

Jermall similarly outlanded Korobov 170-128, though Korobov was slightly more efficient, hitting 28 percent of his attempts to Jermall’s 26. Korobov, who only found home with nine jabs, did connect with 119 power punches to Jermall’s 114.

Though there was some push back in the co-main event, Harrison said he’ll offer Jermell a rematch, likely in the first half of 2019. But he wasn’t shy about agreeing with the judes.

“I dictated the pace, that’s what champions do,” Harrison said post-fight. “He wound up for big shots and I kept my defense tight. All we worked on was defense. I kept my composure and I did what champions do.”
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